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Hodgkin Disease: A malignant disease characterized by progressive enlargement of the lymph nodes, spleen, and general lymphoid tissue. In the classical variant, giant usually multinucleate Hodgkin's and REED-STERNBERG CELLS are present; in the nodular lymphocyte predominant variant, lymphocytic and histiocytic cells are seen.Lymphoma: A general term for various neoplastic diseases of the lymphoid tissue.Lymphoma, B-Cell: A group of heterogeneous lymphoid tumors generally expressing one or more B-cell antigens or representing malignant transformations of B-lymphocytes.Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin: Any of a group of malignant tumors of lymphoid tissue that differ from HODGKIN DISEASE, being more heterogeneous with respect to malignant cell lineage, clinical course, prognosis, and therapy. The only common feature among these tumors is the absence of giant REED-STERNBERG CELLS, a characteristic of Hodgkin's disease.Lymphoma, T-Cell: A group of heterogeneous lymphoid tumors representing malignant transformations of T-lymphocytes.Reed-Sternberg Cells: Large cells, usually multinucleate, whose presence is a common histologic characteristic of classical HODGKIN DISEASE.Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse: Malignant lymphoma composed of large B lymphoid cells whose nuclear size can exceed normal macrophage nuclei, or more than twice the size of a normal lymphocyte. The pattern is predominantly diffuse. Most of these lymphomas represent the malignant counterpart of B-lymphocytes at midstage in the process of differentiation.Lymphoma, Follicular: Malignant lymphoma in which the lymphomatous cells are clustered into identifiable nodules within the LYMPH NODES. The nodules resemble to some extent the GERMINAL CENTER of lymph node follicles and most likely represent neoplastic proliferation of lymph node-derived follicular center B-LYMPHOCYTES.Burkitt Lymphoma: A form of undifferentiated malignant LYMPHOMA usually found in central Africa, but also reported in other parts of the world. It is commonly manifested as a large osteolytic lesion in the jaw or as an abdominal mass. B-cell antigens are expressed on the immature cells that make up the tumor in virtually all cases of Burkitt lymphoma. The Epstein-Barr virus (HERPESVIRUS 4, HUMAN) has been isolated from Burkitt lymphoma cases in Africa and it is implicated as the causative agent in these cases; however, most non-African cases are EBV-negative.Lymphoma, B-Cell, Marginal Zone: Extranodal lymphoma of lymphoid tissue associated with mucosa that is in contact with exogenous antigens. Many of the sites of these lymphomas, such as the stomach, salivary gland, and thyroid, are normally devoid of lymphoid tissue. They acquire mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) type as a result of an immunologically mediated disorder.Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic: A systemic, large-cell, non-Hodgkin, malignant lymphoma characterized by cells with pleomorphic appearance and expressing the CD30 ANTIGEN. These so-called "hallmark" cells have lobulated and indented nuclei. This lymphoma is often mistaken for metastatic carcinoma and MALIGNANT HISTIOCYTOSIS.Lymphoma, Mantle-Cell: A form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma having a usually diffuse pattern with both small and medium lymphocytes and small cleaved cells. It accounts for about 5% of adult non-Hodgkin lymphomas in the United States and Europe. The majority of mantle-cell lymphomas are associated with a t(11;14) translocation resulting in overexpression of the CYCLIN D1 gene (GENES, BCL-1).Lymphoma, AIDS-Related: B-cell lymphoid tumors that occur in association with AIDS. Patients often present with an advanced stage of disease and highly malignant subtypes including BURKITT LYMPHOMA; IMMUNOBLASTIC LARGE-CELL LYMPHOMA; PRIMARY EFFUSION LYMPHOMA; and DIFFUSE, LARGE B-CELL, LYMPHOMA. The tumors are often disseminated in unusual extranodal sites and chromosomal abnormalities are frequently present. It is likely that polyclonal B-cell lymphoproliferation in AIDS is a complex result of EBV infection, HIV antigenic stimulation, and T-cell-dependent HIV activation.Lymphoma, T-Cell, Cutaneous: A group of lymphomas exhibiting clonal expansion of malignant T-lymphocytes arrested at varying stages of differentiation as well as malignant infiltration of the skin. MYCOSIS FUNGOIDES; SEZARY SYNDROME; LYMPHOMATOID PAPULOSIS; and PRIMARY CUTANEOUS ANAPLASTIC LARGE CELL LYMPHOMA are the best characterized of these disorders.Lymphoma, T-Cell, Peripheral: A group of malignant lymphomas thought to derive from peripheral T-lymphocytes in lymph nodes and other nonlymphoid sites. They include a broad spectrum of lymphocyte morphology, but in all instances express T-cell markers admixed with epithelioid histiocytes, plasma cells, and eosinophils. Although markedly similar to large-cell immunoblastic lymphoma (LYMPHOMA, LARGE-CELL, IMMUNOBLASTIC), this group's unique features warrant separate treatment.Antigens, CD30: A member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily that may play a role in the regulation of NF-KAPPA B and APOPTOSIS. They are found on activated T-LYMPHOCYTES; B-LYMPHOCYTES; NEUTROPHILS; EOSINOPHILS; MAST CELLS and NK CELLS. Overexpression of CD30 antigen in hematopoietic malignancies make the antigen clinically useful as a biological tumor marker. Signaling of the receptor occurs through its association with TNF RECEPTOR-ASSOCIATED FACTORS.Vincristine: An antitumor alkaloid isolated from VINCA ROSEA. (Merck, 11th ed.)Prednisone: A synthetic anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid derived from CORTISONE. It is biologically inert and converted to PREDNISOLONE in the liver.Bleomycin: A complex of related glycopeptide antibiotics from Streptomyces verticillus consisting of bleomycin A2 and B2. It inhibits DNA metabolism and is used as an antineoplastic, especially for solid tumors.Herpesvirus 4, Human: The type species of LYMPHOCRYPTOVIRUS, subfamily GAMMAHERPESVIRINAE, infecting B-cells in humans. It is thought to be the causative agent of INFECTIOUS MONONUCLEOSIS and is strongly associated with oral hairy leukoplakia (LEUKOPLAKIA, HAIRY;), BURKITT LYMPHOMA; and other malignancies.Doxorubicin: Antineoplastic antibiotic obtained from Streptomyces peucetius. It is a hydroxy derivative of DAUNORUBICIN.Epstein-Barr Virus Infections: Infection with human herpesvirus 4 (HERPESVIRUS 4, HUMAN); which may facilitate the development of various lymphoproliferative disorders. These include BURKITT LYMPHOMA (African type), INFECTIOUS MONONUCLEOSIS, and oral hairy leukoplakia (LEUKOPLAKIA, HAIRY).Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Immunoblastic: Malignant lymphoma characterized by the presence of immunoblasts with uniformly round-to-oval nuclei, one or more prominent nucleoli, and abundant cytoplasm. This class may be subdivided into plasmacytoid and clear-cell types based on cytoplasmic characteristics. A third category, pleomorphous, may be analogous to some of the peripheral T-cell lymphomas (LYMPHOMA, T-CELL, PERIPHERAL) recorded in both the United States and Japan.Antigens, CD20: Unglycosylated phosphoproteins expressed only on B-cells. They are regulators of transmembrane Ca2+ conductance and thought to play a role in B-cell activation and proliferation.Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols: The use of two or more chemicals simultaneously or sequentially in the drug therapy of neoplasms. The drugs need not be in the same dosage form.Procarbazine: An antineoplastic agent used primarily in combination with mechlorethamine, vincristine, and prednisone (the MOPP protocol) in the treatment of Hodgkin's disease.Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived: Antibodies obtained from a single clone of cells grown in mice or rats.Cyclophosphamide: Precursor of an alkylating nitrogen mustard antineoplastic and immunosuppressive agent that must be activated in the LIVER to form the active aldophosphamide. It has been used in the treatment of LYMPHOMA and LEUKEMIA. Its side effect, ALOPECIA, has been used for defleecing sheep. Cyclophosphamide may also cause sterility, birth defects, mutations, and cancer.Vinblastine: Antitumor alkaloid isolated from Vinca rosea. (Merck, 11th ed.)B-Lymphocytes: Lymphoid cells concerned with humoral immunity. They are short-lived cells resembling bursa-derived lymphocytes of birds in their production of immunoglobulin upon appropriate stimulation.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Immunophenotyping: Process of classifying cells of the immune system based on structural and functional differences. The process is commonly used to analyze and sort T-lymphocytes into subsets based on CD antigens by the technique of flow cytometry.Translocation, Genetic: A type of chromosome aberration characterized by CHROMOSOME BREAKAGE and transfer of the broken-off portion to another location, often to a different chromosome.Lymph Nodes: They are oval or bean shaped bodies (1 - 30 mm in diameter) located along the lymphatic system.Dacarbazine: An antineoplastic agent. It has significant activity against melanomas. (from Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 31st ed, p564)Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Mediastinal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the MEDIASTINUM.Lymphoma, Extranodal NK-T-Cell: An extranodal neoplasm, usually possessing an NK-cell phenotype and associated with EPSTEIN-BARR VIRUS. These lymphomas exhibit a broad morphologic spectrum, frequent necrosis, angioinvasion, and most commonly present in the midfacial region, but also in other extranodal sites.Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-6: A DNA-binding protein that represses GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION of target genes by recruiting HISTONE DEACETYLASES. Aberrant Blc-6 expression is associated with certain types of human B-CELL LYMPHOMA.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Etoposide: A semisynthetic derivative of PODOPHYLLOTOXIN that exhibits antitumor activity. Etoposide inhibits DNA synthesis by forming a complex with topoisomerase II and DNA. This complex induces breaks in double stranded DNA and prevents repair by topoisomerase II binding. Accumulated breaks in DNA prevent entry into the mitotic phase of cell division, and lead to cell death. Etoposide acts primarily in the G2 and S phases of the cell cycle.Remission Induction: Therapeutic act or process that initiates a response to a complete or partial remission level.Combined Modality Therapy: The treatment of a disease or condition by several different means simultaneously or sequentially. Chemoimmunotherapy, RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY, chemoradiotherapy, cryochemotherapy, and SALVAGE THERAPY are seen most frequently, but their combinations with each other and surgery are also used.Neoplasm Staging: Methods which attempt to express in replicable terms the extent of the neoplasm in the patient.Mechlorethamine: A biologic alkylating agent that exerts its cytotoxic effects by forming DNA ADDUCTS and DNA interstrand crosslinks, thereby inhibiting rapidly proliferating cells. The hydrochloride is an antineoplastic agent used to treat HODGKIN DISEASE and LYMPHOMA.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 14: A specific pair of GROUP D CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Gene Rearrangement: The ordered rearrangement of gene regions by DNA recombination such as that which occurs normally during development.Germinal Center: The activated center of a lymphoid follicle in secondary lymphoid tissue where B-LYMPHOCYTES are stimulated by antigens and helper T cells (T-LYMPHOCYTES, HELPER-INDUCER) are stimulated to generate memory cells.Disease-Free Survival: Period after successful treatment in which there is no appearance of the symptoms or effects of the disease.Antibodies, Monoclonal: Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.Transplantation, Autologous: Transplantation of an individual's own tissue from one site to another site.Cell Line, Tumor: A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.Neoplasms, Second Primary: Abnormal growths of tissue that follow a previous neoplasm but are not metastases of the latter. The second neoplasm may have the same or different histological type and can occur in the same or different organs as the previous neoplasm but in all cases arises from an independent oncogenic event. The development of the second neoplasm may or may not be related to the treatment for the previous neoplasm since genetic risk or predisposing factors may actually be the cause.Tumor Markers, Biological: Molecular products metabolized and secreted by neoplastic tissue and characterized biochemically in cells or body fluids. They are indicators of tumor stage and grade as well as useful for monitoring responses to treatment and predicting recurrence. Many chemical groups are represented including hormones, antigens, amino and nucleic acids, enzymes, polyamines, and specific cell membrane proteins and lipids.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 18: A specific pair of GROUP E CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Antineoplastic Agents: Substances that inhibit or prevent the proliferation of NEOPLASMS.Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Chronic, B-Cell: A chronic leukemia characterized by abnormal B-lymphocytes and often generalized lymphadenopathy. In patients presenting predominately with blood and bone marrow involvement it is called chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL); in those predominately with enlarged lymph nodes it is called small lymphocytic lymphoma. These terms represent spectrums of the same disease.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Gene Rearrangement, B-Lymphocyte, Heavy Chain: Ordered rearrangement of B-lymphocyte variable gene regions of the IMMUNOGLOBULIN HEAVY CHAINS, thereby contributing to antibody diversity. It occurs during the first stage of differentiation of the IMMATURE B-LYMPHOCYTES.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Immunoglobulin Heavy Chains: The largest of polypeptide chains comprising immunoglobulins. They contain 450 to 600 amino acid residues per chain, and have molecular weights of 51-72 kDa.Tumor Cells, Cultured: Cells grown in vitro from neoplastic tissue. If they can be established as a TUMOR CELL LINE, they can be propagated in cell culture indefinitely.Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in neoplastic tissue.Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Salvage Therapy: A therapeutic approach, involving chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or surgery, after initial regimens have failed to lead to improvement in a patient's condition. Salvage therapy is most often used for neoplastic diseases.Genes, Immunoglobulin: Genes encoding the different subunits of the IMMUNOGLOBULINS, for example the IMMUNOGLOBULIN LIGHT CHAIN GENES and the IMMUNOGLOBULIN HEAVY CHAIN GENES. The heavy and light immunoglobulin genes are present as gene segments in the germline cells. The completed genes are created when the segments are shuffled and assembled (B-LYMPHOCYTE GENE REARRANGEMENT) during B-LYMPHOCYTE maturation. The gene segments of the human light and heavy chain germline genes are symbolized V (variable), J (joining) and C (constant). The heavy chain germline genes have an additional segment D (diversity).Lymphoproliferative Disorders: Disorders characterized by proliferation of lymphoid tissue, general or unspecified.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Thymus Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the THYMUS GLAND.Central Nervous System Neoplasms: Benign and malignant neoplastic processes that arise from or secondarily involve the brain, spinal cord, or meninges.Gene Rearrangement, B-Lymphocyte: Ordered rearrangement of B-lymphocyte variable gene regions coding for the IMMUNOGLOBULIN CHAINS, thereby contributing to antibody diversity. It occurs during the differentiation of the IMMATURE B-LYMPHOCYTES.DNA, Neoplasm: DNA present in neoplastic tissue.Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.Flow Cytometry: Technique using an instrument system for making, processing, and displaying one or more measurements on individual cells obtained from a cell suspension. Cells are usually stained with one or more fluorescent dyes specific to cell components of interest, e.g., DNA, and fluorescence of each cell is measured as it rapidly transverses the excitation beam (laser or mercury arc lamp). Fluorescence provides a quantitative measure of various biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell, as well as a basis for cell sorting. Other measurable optical parameters include light absorption and light scattering, the latter being applicable to the measurement of cell size, shape, density, granularity, and stain uptake.Neoplasm Proteins: Proteins whose abnormal expression (gain or loss) are associated with the development, growth, or progression of NEOPLASMS. Some neoplasm proteins are tumor antigens (ANTIGENS, NEOPLASM), i.e. they induce an immune reaction to their tumor. Many neoplasm proteins have been characterized and are used as tumor markers (BIOMARKERS, TUMOR) when they are detectable in cells and body fluids as monitors for the presence or growth of tumors. Abnormal expression of ONCOGENE PROTEINS is involved in neoplastic transformation, whereas the loss of expression of TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEINS is involved with the loss of growth control and progression of the neoplasm.Positron-Emission Tomography: An imaging technique using compounds labelled with short-lived positron-emitting radionuclides (such as carbon-11, nitrogen-13, oxygen-15 and fluorine-18) to measure cell metabolism. It has been useful in study of soft tissues such as CANCER; CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM; and brain. SINGLE-PHOTON EMISSION-COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY is closely related to positron emission tomography, but uses isotopes with longer half-lives and resolution is lower.Lymphocytes: White blood cells formed in the body's lymphoid tissue. The nucleus is round or ovoid with coarse, irregularly clumped chromatin while the cytoplasm is typically pale blue with azurophilic (if any) granules. Most lymphocytes can be classified as either T or B (with subpopulations of each), or NATURAL KILLER CELLS.Viral Matrix Proteins: Proteins associated with the inner surface of the lipid bilayer of the viral envelope. These proteins have been implicated in control of viral transcription and may possibly serve as the "glue" that binds the nucleocapsid to the appropriate membrane site during viral budding from the host cell.In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence: A type of IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION in which target sequences are stained with fluorescent dye so their location and size can be determined using fluorescence microscopy. This staining is sufficiently distinct that the hybridization signal can be seen both in metaphase spreads and in interphase nuclei.Eye Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the EYE.Leukemia: A progressive, malignant disease of the blood-forming organs, characterized by distorted proliferation and development of leukocytes and their precursors in the blood and bone marrow. Leukemias were originally termed acute or chronic based on life expectancy but now are classified according to cellular maturity. Acute leukemias consist of predominately immature cells; chronic leukemias are composed of more mature cells. (From The Merck Manual, 2006)Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Antigens, CD: Differentiation antigens residing on mammalian leukocytes. CD stands for cluster of differentiation, which refers to groups of monoclonal antibodies that show similar reactivity with certain subpopulations of antigens of a particular lineage or differentiation stage. The subpopulations of antigens are also known by the same CD designation.Pseudolymphoma: A group of disorders having a benign course but exhibiting clinical and histological features suggestive of malignant lymphoma. Pseudolymphoma is characterized by a benign infiltration of lymphoid cells or histiocytes which microscopically resembles a malignant lymphoma. (From Dorland, 28th ed & Stedman, 26th ed)Radiotherapy: The use of IONIZING RADIATION to treat malignant NEOPLASMS and some benign conditions.T-Lymphocytes: Lymphocytes responsible for cell-mediated immunity. Two types have been identified - cytotoxic (T-LYMPHOCYTES, CYTOTOXIC) and helper T-lymphocytes (T-LYMPHOCYTES, HELPER-INDUCER). They are formed when lymphocytes circulate through the THYMUS GLAND and differentiate to thymocytes. When exposed to an antigen, they divide rapidly and produce large numbers of new T cells sensitized to that antigen.Nose Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the NOSE.Mycosis Fungoides: A chronic, malignant T-cell lymphoma of the skin. In the late stages, the LYMPH NODES and viscera are affected.Apoptosis: One of the mechanisms by which CELL DEATH occurs (compare with NECROSIS and AUTOPHAGOCYTOSIS). Apoptosis is the mechanism responsible for the physiological deletion of cells and appears to be intrinsically programmed. It is characterized by distinctive morphologic changes in the nucleus and cytoplasm, chromatin cleavage at regularly spaced sites, and the endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA; (DNA FRAGMENTATION); at internucleosomal sites. This mode of cell death serves as a balance to mitosis in regulating the size of animal tissues and in mediating pathologic processes associated with tumor growth.Skin Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the SKIN.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Octamer Transcription Factor-2: An octamer transcription factor expressed primarily in B-LYMPHOCYTES and the developing CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that regulates GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION of IMMUNOGLOBULIN GENES.Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Transfer of HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS from BONE MARROW or BLOOD between individuals within the same species (TRANSPLANTATION, HOMOLOGOUS) or transfer within the same individual (TRANSPLANTATION, AUTOLOGOUS). Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been used as an alternative to BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION in the treatment of a variety of neoplasms.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Antigens, CD79: A component of the B-cell antigen receptor that is involved in B-cell antigen receptor heavy chain transport to the PLASMA MEMBRANE. It is expressed almost exclusively in B-LYMPHOCYTES and serves as a useful marker for B-cell NEOPLASMS.Lymphatic Diseases: Diseases of LYMPH; LYMPH NODES; or LYMPHATIC VESSELS.Genes, rel: Family of retrovirus-associated DNA sequences (v-rel) originally isolated from an avian reticuloendotheliosis virus strain. The proto-oncogene rel (c-rel) codes for a subcellular (nuclear and cytoplasmic) transcription factor that has a role in lymphocyte differentiation. Translocation or overexpression of c-rel or competition from v-rel causes oncogenesis. The human rel gene is located at 2p12-13 on the short arm of chromosome 2.B-Cell-Specific Activator Protein: A transcription factor that is essential for CELL DIFFERENTIATION of B-LYMPHOCYTES. It functions both as a transcriptional activator and repressor to mediate B-cell commitment.Gene Expression Profiling: The determination of the pattern of genes expressed at the level of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION, under specific circumstances or in a specific cell.Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced: Tumors, cancer or other neoplasms produced by exposure to ionizing or non-ionizing radiation.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Immunoconjugates: Combinations of diagnostic or therapeutic substances linked with specific immune substances such as IMMUNOGLOBULINS; MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES; or ANTIGENS. Often the diagnostic or therapeutic substance is a radionuclide. These conjugates are useful tools for specific targeting of DRUGS and RADIOISOTOPES in the CHEMOTHERAPY and RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY of certain cancers.In Situ Hybridization: A technique that localizes specific nucleic acid sequences within intact chromosomes, eukaryotic cells, or bacterial cells through the use of specific nucleic acid-labeled probes.Fluorodeoxyglucose F18: The compound is given by intravenous injection to do POSITRON-EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY for the assessment of cerebral and myocardial glucose metabolism in various physiological or pathological states including stroke and myocardial ischemia. It is also employed for the detection of malignant tumors including those of the brain, liver, and thyroid gland. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1162)Lymphatic Irradiation: External or interstitial irradiation to treat lymphomas (e.g., Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas) and lymph node metastases and also some autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis.Chemokine CCL17: A CC-type chemokine that is found at high levels in the THYMUS and has specificity for CCR4 RECEPTORS. It is synthesized by DENDRITIC CELLS; ENDOTHELIAL CELLS; KERATINOCYTES; and FIBROBLASTS.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Antigens, Neoplasm: Proteins, glycoprotein, or lipoprotein moieties on surfaces of tumor cells that are usually identified by monoclonal antibodies. Many of these are of either embryonic or viral origin.Antigens, CD15: A trisaccharide antigen expressed on glycolipids and many cell-surface glycoproteins. In the blood the antigen is found on the surface of NEUTROPHILS; EOSINOPHILS; and MONOCYTES. In addition, CD15 antigen is a stage-specific embryonic antigen.Methotrexate: An antineoplastic antimetabolite with immunosuppressant properties. It is an inhibitor of TETRAHYDROFOLATE DEHYDROGENASE and prevents the formation of tetrahydrofolate, necessary for synthesis of thymidylate, an essential component of DNA.Cytarabine: A pyrimidine nucleoside analog that is used mainly in the treatment of leukemia, especially acute non-lymphoblastic leukemia. Cytarabine is an antimetabolite antineoplastic agent that inhibits the synthesis of DNA. Its actions are specific for the S phase of the cell cycle. It also has antiviral and immunosuppressant properties. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p472)Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Clone Cells: A group of genetically identical cells all descended from a single common ancestral cell by mitosis in eukaryotes or by binary fission in prokaryotes. Clone cells also include populations of recombinant DNA molecules all carrying the same inserted sequence. (From King & Stansfield, Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell: IMMUNOGLOBULINS on the surface of B-LYMPHOCYTES. Their MESSENGER RNA contains an EXON with a membrane spanning sequence, producing immunoglobulins in the form of type I transmembrane proteins as opposed to secreted immunoglobulins (ANTIBODIES) which do not contain the membrane spanning segment.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Cell Transformation, Neoplastic: Cell changes manifested by escape from control mechanisms, increased growth potential, alterations in the cell surface, karyotypic abnormalities, morphological and biochemical deviations from the norm, and other attributes conferring the ability to invade, metastasize, and kill.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Immunoenzyme Techniques: Immunologic techniques based on the use of: (1) enzyme-antibody conjugates; (2) enzyme-antigen conjugates; (3) antienzyme antibody followed by its homologous enzyme; or (4) enzyme-antienzyme complexes. These are used histologically for visualizing or labeling tissue specimens.Genes, myc: Family of retrovirus-associated DNA sequences (myc) originally isolated from an avian myelocytomatosis virus. The proto-oncogene myc (c-myc) codes for a nuclear protein which is involved in nucleic acid metabolism and in mediating the cellular response to growth factors. Truncation of the first exon, which appears to regulate c-myc expression, is crucial for tumorigenicity. The human c-myc gene is located at 8q24 on the long arm of chromosome 8.Bone Marrow: The soft tissue filling the cavities of bones. Bone marrow exists in two types, yellow and red. Yellow marrow is found in the large cavities of large bones and consists mostly of fat cells and a few primitive blood cells. Red marrow is a hematopoietic tissue and is the site of production of erythrocytes and granular leukocytes. Bone marrow is made up of a framework of connective tissue containing branching fibers with the frame being filled with marrow cells.Chromosome Aberrations: Abnormal number or structure of chromosomes. Chromosome aberrations may result in CHROMOSOME DISORDERS.Radioimmunotherapy: Radiotherapy where cytotoxic radionuclides are linked to antibodies in order to deliver toxins directly to tumor targets. Therapy with targeted radiation rather than antibody-targeted toxins (IMMUNOTOXINS) has the advantage that adjacent tumor cells, which lack the appropriate antigenic determinants, can be destroyed by radiation cross-fire. Radioimmunotherapy is sometimes called targeted radiotherapy, but this latter term can also refer to radionuclides linked to non-immune molecules (see RADIOTHERAPY).Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2: Membrane proteins encoded by the BCL-2 GENES and serving as potent inhibitors of cell death by APOPTOSIS. The proteins are found on mitochondrial, microsomal, and NUCLEAR MEMBRANE sites within many cell types. Overexpression of bcl-2 proteins, due to a translocation of the gene, is associated with follicular lymphoma.DNA-Binding Proteins: Proteins which bind to DNA. The family includes proteins which bind to both double- and single-stranded DNA and also includes specific DNA binding proteins in serum which can be used as markers for malignant diseases.Hematologic Neoplasms: Neoplasms located in the blood and blood-forming tissue (the bone marrow and lymphatic tissue). The commonest forms are the various types of LEUKEMIA, of LYMPHOMA, and of the progressive, life-threatening forms of the MYELODYSPLASTIC SYNDROMES.Leukemia, B-Cell: A malignant disease of the B-LYMPHOCYTES in the bone marrow and/or blood.Genes, bcl-2: The B-cell leukemia/lymphoma-2 genes, responsible for blocking apoptosis in normal cells, and associated with follicular lymphoma when overexpressed. Overexpression results from the t(14;18) translocation. The human c-bcl-2 gene is located at 18q24 on the long arm of chromosome 18.Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigens: Nuclear antigens encoded by VIRAL GENES found in HUMAN HERPESVIRUS 4. At least six nuclear antigens have been identified.Proto-Oncogene Proteins: Products of proto-oncogenes. Normally they do not have oncogenic or transforming properties, but are involved in the regulation or differentiation of cell growth. They often have protein kinase activity.Leukemia L5178: An experimental lymphocytic leukemia of mice.Enteropathy-Associated T-Cell Lymphoma: A primary peripheral T-cell lymphoma in the gastrointestinal tract, most often in the jejunum, associated with a history of CELIAC DISEASE or other gastrointestinal diseases.Neoplasm Recurrence, Local: The local recurrence of a neoplasm following treatment. It arises from microscopic cells of the original neoplasm that have escaped therapeutic intervention and later become clinically visible at the original site.Survivors: Persons who have experienced a prolonged survival after serious disease or who continue to live with a usually life-threatening condition as well as family members, significant others, or individuals surviving traumatic life events.Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Leukemia-Lymphoma, Adult T-Cell: Aggressive T-Cell malignancy with adult onset, caused by HUMAN T-LYMPHOTROPIC VIRUS 1. It is endemic in Japan, the Caribbean basin, Southeastern United States, Hawaii, and parts of Central and South America and sub-Saharan Africa.Neoplasms, Multiple Primary: Two or more abnormal growths of tissue occurring simultaneously and presumed to be of separate origin. The neoplasms may be histologically the same or different, and may be found in the same or different sites.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 2: A specific pair of human chromosomes in group A (CHROMOSOMES, HUMAN, 1-3) of the human chromosome classification.Mice, SCID: Mice homozygous for the mutant autosomal recessive gene "scid" which is located on the centromeric end of chromosome 16. These mice lack mature, functional lymphocytes and are thus highly susceptible to lethal opportunistic infections if not chronically treated with antibiotics. The lack of B- and T-cell immunity resembles severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) syndrome in human infants. SCID mice are useful as animal models since they are receptive to implantation of a human immune system producing SCID-human (SCID-hu) hematochimeric mice.Composite Lymphoma: Two or more distinct types of malignant lymphoid tumors occurring within a single organ or tissue at the same time. It may contain different types of non-Hodgkin lymphoma cells or both Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma cells.Intestinal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the INTESTINES.Lymphoid Tissue: Specialized tissues that are components of the lymphatic system. They provide fixed locations within the body where a variety of LYMPHOCYTES can form, mature and multiply. The lymphoid tissues are connected by a network of LYMPHATIC VESSELS.Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Kaplan-Meier Estimate: A nonparametric method of compiling LIFE TABLES or survival tables. It combines calculated probabilities of survival and estimates to allow for observations occurring beyond a measurement threshold, which are assumed to occur randomly. Time intervals are defined as ending each time an event occurs and are therefore unequal. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1995)Radiotherapy Dosage: The total amount of radiation absorbed by tissues as a result of radiotherapy.Carmustine: A cell-cycle phase nonspecific alkylating antineoplastic agent. It is used in the treatment of brain tumors and various other malignant neoplasms. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p462) This substance may reasonably be anticipated to be a carcinogen according to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985). (From Merck Index, 11th ed)Neprilysin: Enzyme that is a major constituent of kidney brush-border membranes and is also present to a lesser degree in the brain and other tissues. It preferentially catalyzes cleavage at the amino group of hydrophobic residues of the B-chain of insulin as well as opioid peptides and other biologically active peptides. The enzyme is inhibited primarily by EDTA, phosphoramidon, and thiorphan and is reactivated by zinc. Neprilysin is identical to common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen (CALLA Antigen), an important marker in the diagnosis of human acute lymphocytic leukemia. There is no relationship with CALLA PLANT.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 11: A specific pair of GROUP C CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Gene Rearrangement, B-Lymphocyte, Light Chain: Ordered rearrangement of B-lymphocyte variable gene regions coding for the kappa or lambda IMMUNOGLOBULIN LIGHT CHAINS, thereby contributing to antibody diversity. It occurs during the second stage of differentiation of the IMMATURE B-LYMPHOCYTES.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Orbital Neoplasms: Neoplasms of the bony orbit and contents except the eyeball.Antigens, CD5: Glycoproteins expressed on all mature T-cells, thymocytes, and a subset of mature B-cells. Antibodies specific for CD5 can enhance T-cell receptor-mediated T-cell activation. The B-cell-specific molecule CD72 is a natural ligand for CD5. (From Abbas et al., Cellular and Molecular Immunology, 2d ed, p156)Tissue Array Analysis: The simultaneous analysis of multiple samples of TISSUES or CELLS from BIOPSY or in vitro culture that have been arranged in an array format on slides or microchips.Cell Proliferation: All of the processes involved in increasing CELL NUMBER including CELL DIVISION.Transplantation Conditioning: Preparative treatment of transplant recipient with various conditioning regimens including radiation, immune sera, chemotherapy, and/or immunosuppressive agents, prior to transplantation. Transplantation conditioning is very common before bone marrow transplantation.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Genes, Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain: Genes and gene segments encoding the IMMUNOGLOBULIN HEAVY CHAINS. Gene segments of the heavy chain genes are symbolized V (variable), D (diversity), J (joining), and C (constant).Disease Progression: The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.Stomach Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the STOMACH.Gastrointestinal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT, from the MOUTH to the ANAL CANAL.Herpesvirus 8, Human: A species in the genus RHADINOVIRUS, subfamily GAMMAHERPESVIRINAE, isolated from patients with AIDS-related and "classical" Kaposi sarcoma.Immunoglobulin Variable Region: That region of the immunoglobulin molecule that varies in its amino acid sequence and composition, and comprises the binding site for a specific antigen. It is located at the N-terminus of the Fab fragment of the immunoglobulin. It includes hypervariable regions (COMPLEMENTARITY DETERMINING REGIONS) and framework regions.Tumor Virus Infections: Infections produced by oncogenic viruses. The infections caused by DNA viruses are less numerous but more diverse than those caused by the RNA oncogenic viruses.Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-myc: Cellular DNA-binding proteins encoded by the c-myc genes. They are normally involved in nucleic acid metabolism and in mediating the cellular response to growth factors. Elevated and deregulated (constitutive) expression of c-myc proteins can cause tumorigenesis.Prednisolone: A glucocorticoid with the general properties of the corticosteroids. It is the drug of choice for all conditions in which routine systemic corticosteroid therapy is indicated, except adrenal deficiency states.Galectin 1: A galectin found abundantly in smooth muscle (MUSCLE, SMOOTH) and SKELETAL MUSCLE and many other tissues. It occurs as a homodimer with two 14-kDa subunits.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Radiopharmaceuticals: Compounds that are used in medicine as sources of radiation for radiotherapy and for diagnostic purposes. They have numerous uses in research and industry. (Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1161)Cell Survival: The span of viability of a cell characterized by the capacity to perform certain functions such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, some form of responsiveness, and adaptability.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Sialic Acid Binding Ig-like Lectin 2: A lectin and cell adhesion molecule found in B-LYMPHOCYTES. It interacts with SIALIC ACIDS and mediates signaling from B-CELL ANTIGEN RECEPTORS.NF-kappa B: Ubiquitous, inducible, nuclear transcriptional activator that binds to enhancer elements in many different cell types and is activated by pathogenic stimuli. The NF-kappa B complex is a heterodimer composed of two DNA-binding subunits: NF-kappa B1 and relA.Neoplasm Transplantation: Experimental transplantation of neoplasms in laboratory animals for research purposes.Infectious Mononucleosis: A common, acute infection usually caused by the Epstein-Barr virus (HERPESVIRUS 4, HUMAN). There is an increase in mononuclear white blood cells and other atypical lymphocytes, generalized lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, and occasionally hepatomegaly with hepatitis.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Space-Time Clustering: A statistically significant excess of cases of a disease, occurring within a limited space-time continuum.Transcription Factors: Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.GermanyImmunotherapy: Manipulation of the host's immune system in treatment of disease. It includes both active and passive immunization as well as immunosuppressive therapy to prevent graft rejection.Drug Resistance, Neoplasm: Resistance or diminished response of a neoplasm to an antineoplastic agent in humans, animals, or cell or tissue cultures.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Protein-Tyrosine Kinases: Protein kinases that catalyze the PHOSPHORYLATION of TYROSINE residues in proteins with ATP or other nucleotides as phosphate donors.Leukemia, Lymphoid: Leukemia associated with HYPERPLASIA of the lymphoid tissues and increased numbers of circulating malignant LYMPHOCYTES and lymphoblasts.Fertility Preservation: A method of providing future reproductive opportunities before a medical treatment with known risk of loss of fertility. Typically reproductive organs or tissues (e.g., sperm, egg, embryos and ovarian or testicular tissues) are cryopreserved for future use before the medical treatment (e.g., chemotherapy, radiation) begins.Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases: A class of cellular receptors that have an intrinsic PROTEIN-TYROSINE KINASE activity.Decapodiformes: A superorder of CEPHALOPODS comprised of squid, cuttlefish, and their relatives. Their distinguishing feature is the modification of their fourth pair of arms into tentacles, resulting in 10 limbs.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis: Hybridization of a nucleic acid sample to a very large set of OLIGONUCLEOTIDE PROBES, which have been attached individually in columns and rows to a solid support, to determine a BASE SEQUENCE, or to detect variations in a gene sequence, GENE EXPRESSION, or for GENE MAPPING.Immunoglobulins: Multi-subunit proteins which function in IMMUNITY. They are produced by B LYMPHOCYTES from the IMMUNOGLOBULIN GENES. They are comprised of two heavy (IMMUNOGLOBULIN HEAVY CHAINS) and two light chains (IMMUNOGLOBULIN LIGHT CHAINS) with additional ancillary polypeptide chains depending on their isoforms. The variety of isoforms include monomeric or polymeric forms, and transmembrane forms (B-CELL ANTIGEN RECEPTORS) or secreted forms (ANTIBODIES). They are divided by the amino acid sequence of their heavy chains into five classes (IMMUNOGLOBULIN A; IMMUNOGLOBULIN D; IMMUNOGLOBULIN E; IMMUNOGLOBULIN G; IMMUNOGLOBULIN M) and various subclasses.Mediastinum: A membrane in the midline of the THORAX of mammals. It separates the lungs between the STERNUM in front and the VERTEBRAL COLUMN behind. It also surrounds the HEART, TRACHEA, ESOPHAGUS, THYMUS, and LYMPH NODES.Paraffin Embedding: The infiltrating of tissue specimens with paraffin, as a supporting substance, to prepare for sectioning with a microtome.Gallium Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of gallium that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Ga atoms with atomic weights 63-68, 70 and 72-76 are radioactive gallium isotopes.Melphalan: An alkylating nitrogen mustard that is used as an antineoplastic in the form of the levo isomer - MELPHALAN, the racemic mixture - MERPHALAN, and the dextro isomer - MEDPHALAN; toxic to bone marrow, but little vesicant action; potential carcinogen.Killer Cells, Natural: Bone marrow-derived lymphocytes that possess cytotoxic properties, classically directed against transformed and virus-infected cells. Unlike T CELLS; and B CELLS; NK CELLS are not antigen specific. The cytotoxicity of natural killer cells is determined by the collective signaling of an array of inhibitory and stimulatory CELL SURFACE RECEPTORS. A subset of T-LYMPHOCYTES referred to as NATURAL KILLER T CELLS shares some of the properties of this cell type.Risk: The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.Mice, Inbred AKRCell Division: The fission of a CELL. It includes CYTOKINESIS, when the CYTOPLASM of a cell is divided, and CELL NUCLEUS DIVISION.

*  Alisertib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Peripheral T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma - Study Results -...
Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma. Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma. Recurrent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma. Recurrent ... Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma. Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma. Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma. ... Alisertib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Peripheral T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma. This study has been ... Name/Title: Lymphoma Committee Statistician. Organization: SWOG Statistical Center. phone: 206-667-4623. e-mail: hongli@ ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/results/NCT01466881?term=S1108%2C+A+Phase+II+Trial+of+the+Aurora+Kinase+A+Inhibitor+MLN8237&rank=1
*  Wyeth's Torisel Approved by European Commission for the Treatment of Relapsed and/or Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma |...
MCL is a rare type of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) that accounts for approximately 6 percent of NHL cases and has the lowest ... "Relapsed and refractory mantle cell lymphoma is a difficult-to-treat disease, and the ability of TORISEL to improve progression ... Wyeth's Torisel Approved by European Commission for the Treatment of Relapsed and/or Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma. 27.08. ... "With this approval, TORISEL will now be available to benefit patients with relapsed or refractory mantle cell lymphoma, for ...
https://www.presseportal.ch/de/pm/100006587/100588778
*  MUC1 (EMA) is preferentially expressed by ALK positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma, in the normally glycosylated or only...
Hodgkin's disease. Systemic (nodal) anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a CD30 positive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of T cell ... but not in other non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease, or lymphomatoid papulosis. Blood 1996;88:1771-9. ... Hodgkin's disease. In: Canellos GP, Lister TA, Sklar JL, eds. The lymphomas. Philadelphia: WB Saunders, 1998:305-31. ... Fusion of a kinase gene, ALK, to a nucleolar protein gene, NPM, in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Science 1994;263:1281-84. ...
http://jcp.bmj.com/content/54/12/933
*  AIDS-Related Lymphoma in Children
AIDS-related lymphoma is a type of cancer called non-Hodgkin lymphoma. It grows in some people with AIDS. AIDS is a disease ... What is AIDS-related lymphoma in a child?. AIDS-related lymphoma is a type of cancer called non-Hodgkin lymphoma. It grows in ... Key points about AIDS-related lymphoma in a child. *AIDS-related lymphoma a type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. It grows in some ... The 3 main types of AIDS-related lymphoma are:. *Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. This is the most common type of non-Hodgkin ...
http://healthlibrary.cityofhope.org/Library/Encyclopedia/160,41
*  Alisertib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Peripheral T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma - Full Text View -...
Lymphoma. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin. Lymphoma, T-Cell. Leukemia, T-Cell. Leukemia-Lymphoma, Adult T-Cell. Lymphoma, Large-Cell, ... Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Recurrent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Recurrent ... Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma ... Alisertib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Peripheral T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma. This study has been ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT01466881
*  DermIS - Immunoblastic Lymphoma (information on the diagnosis)
Diffuse non-Hodgkin's immunoblastic (diffuse) lymphoma, Immunobl mal lymph - larg cell, Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma, ... Large Cell Immunoblastic Lymphoma, Large-Cell Immunoblastic Lymphoma, Large-Cell Immunoblastic Lymphomas, Large-Cell Lymphoma, ... Lymphoma, Immunoblastic Large-Cell, Lymphoma, Immunoblastic, Large Cell, Lymphoma, Immunoblastic, Large-Cell, Lymphoma, Large ... Immunoblastic Large-Cell Lymphoma, Immunoblastic Large-Cell Lymphomas, Immunoblastic lymphoma, Immunoblastic Lymphoma, Large- ...
http://www.dermis.net/dermisroot/en/20237/diagnosep.htm
*  Prognostic value of the Follicular Lymphoma International Prognostic Index score in marginal zone lymphoma - Heilgeist - 2012 -...
No authors listed] A predictive model for aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The International Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma ... Marginal zone lymphomas (MZLs) are a non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) subgroup that arises from postgerminal center marginal zone B ... Tumor burden and serum level of soluble CD25, CD8, CD23, CD54 and CD44 in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Haematologica. 1998; 83: 752- ... Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Classification Project. J Clin Oncol. 1999; 17: 2486-2492.. *PubMed , ...
http://www.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/cncr.27704/full
*  Idelalisib Shows Response in Refractory Indolent Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma - MPR
... an oral PI3K delta inhibitor for the treatment of patients with indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma that is refractory to rituximab ... small lymphocytic lymphoma (n=28), lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma / Waldenström macroglobulinemia (n=10) or marginal zone lymphoma ... for the treatment of patients with indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (iNHL) that is refractory (non-responsive) to rituximab and ... The study enrolled 125 patients with a median age of 64 and had confirmed diagnoses of follicular lymphoma (n=72), ...
http://www.empr.com/drugs-in-the-pipeline/idelalisib-shows-response-in-refractory-indolent-non-hodgkins-lymphoma/article/298981/
*  ICD-10 Diagnosis Code C81.0 Nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma
Hodgkin Disease Also called: Hodgkin lymphoma. Hodgkin disease is a type of lymphoma. Lymphoma is a cancer of a part of the ... Nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma Long Description: Nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma This is the ... Hodgkin lymphoma - children (Medical Encyclopedia). *What to Know about External Beam Radiation Therapy - NIH - Easy-to-Read ( ... To diagnose Hodgkin disease, doctors use a physical exam and history, blood tests, and a biopsy. Treatment depends on how far ...
https://icdlist.com/icd-10/c810
*  Serum soluble CD23 level correlates with subsequent development of AIDS-related non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. - Semantic Scholar
... has been shown to act as a B cell growth factor and to be elevated in serum prior to development of AIDS-related non-Hodgkin's ... lymphoma (AIDS NHL). To further characterize the elevation of serum sCD23 in AIDS NHL patients and investigate its potential as ... Polymorphisms in immune function genes and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma: findings from the New South Wales non-Hodgkin Lymphoma ... Markers of B-cell activation in relation to risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma.. *Anneclaire J De Roos, Dana K Mirick, +5 authors ...
https://www.semanticscholar.org/paper/Serum-soluble-CD23-level-correlates-with-subsequen-Schroeder-Saah/b27b390d6c17780284a167baf0c1c808ee43ea58
*  Vorinostat in Patients With Primary Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin. Vorinostat. Antineoplastic Agents. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors. Enzyme Inhibitors. Molecular ... Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma Stage III Cutaneous T-cell ... Lymphoma. Lymphoma, T-Cell. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Cutaneous. Neoplasms by Histologic Type. Neoplasms. Lymphoproliferative Disorders ... Vorinostat in Patients With Primary Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma. The safety and scientific validity of this study is the ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT00958074
*  Treatment of nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma
... is an uncommon subtype of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). This disorder is differentiated from all other forms of HL, which are commonly ... referred to as classical Hodgkin lymphomas (cHLs), by characterist ... Nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL) is an uncommon subtype of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). This disorder is ... Treating limited-stage nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma similarly to classical Hodgkin lymphoma with ABVD may ...
https://www.uptodate.com/contents/treatment-of-nodular-lymphocyte-predominant-hodgkin-lymphoma
*  Study Evaluating TRU-015 in B-Cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov
Lymphoma. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin. Lymphoma, B-Cell. Neoplasms by Histologic Type. Neoplasms. Lymphoproliferative Disorders. ... follicular lymphoma, mantle cell lymphoma, diffuse large-cell B cell lymphoma, and mediastinal large B cell lymphoma. Small ... Study Evaluating TRU-015 in B-Cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma. The safety and scientific validity of this study is the ... This is a study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of TRU-015 in treatment of B-cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL). ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT00521638
*  Winning the Battle at the Front Lines: Lenalidomide Plus Rituximab - A Promising Initial Treatment for Mantle Cell Lymphoma -...
Lenalidomide was first studied as a single agent in non-Hodgkin lymphoma by Wiernik and colleagues in 2008.4 In 49 patients, ... 4. Wiernik PH, et al: Lenalidomide monotherapy in relapsed or refractory aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. J Clin Oncol 26: ... primary mantle cell lymphoma cells, and mantle cell lymphoma-bearing patient-derived xenograft mice. The combination was shown ... Lenalidomide Plus Rituximab Highly Active in Initial Treatment of Mantle Cell Lymphoma. In a phase II trial reported in The New ...
http://www.ascopost.com/issues/january-25-2016/winning-the-battle-at-the-front-lines-lenalidomide-plus-rituximab-a-promising-initial-treatment-for-mantle-cell-lymphoma/
*  Selumetinib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma - Tabular View - ClinicalTrials.gov
... other than non-Hodgkin lymphoma [NHL]), and they are not taking combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) at the time of study ... Response for this lymphoma clinical study was measured utilizing 'Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma Response Criteria'. These criteria are ... Relapsed or refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (transformed large cell lymphomas are allowed to enroll) ... Selumetinib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma. The safety and scientific validity ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/record/NCT01278615?term=MEK+Inhibitor+AZD-6244
*  Bortezomib and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma - Full Text View -...
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin. Lenalidomide. Thalidomide. Bortezomib. Immunologic Factors. Physiological Effects of Drugs. Angiogenesis ... Creatinine =, 1.5 x upper limit of normal (ULN) (unless attributable to non-Hodgkin's lymphoma) and estimated creatinine ... Total bilirubin =, 2 x ULN (unless attributable to non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and Gilbert's disease) ... Lymphoma. Lymphoma, Mantle-Cell. Neoplasms by Histologic Type. Neoplasms. Lymphoproliferative Disorders. Lymphatic Diseases. ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00553644
*  A Phase II Study of Xcellerated T CellsTM in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Indolent Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL) -...
This is a Phase II single arm study of a novel T cell immunotherapy in patients with indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). ... A Phase II Study of Xcellerated T CellsTM in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Indolent Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL) Next ... A Phase II Study of Xcellerated T CellsTM in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Indolent Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL) ...
http://adisinsight.springer.com/trials/700281205?error=cookies_not_supported&code=46f79dd6-14c2-4be6-bc7b-fed5eb77e686
*  European CHMP Issues Positive Opinion on Wyeth's TORISEL for Treatment of Relapsed/Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma |...
MCL is a rare type of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) that accounts for approximately 6 percent of NHL cases and has the lowest ... "Mantle cell lymphoma that has relapsed or is refractory to other therapies is extremely difficult to treat," says Mikael ... European CHMP Issues Positive Opinion on Wyeth's TORISEL for Treatment of Relapsed/Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma. 27.07.2009 ... for the treatment of relapsed and/or refractory mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). The CHMP's opinion will now be forwarded to the ...
https://www.presseportal.ch/de/pm/100016597/100587180
*  Alisertib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Peripheral T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma - Full Text View -...
Lymphoma. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin. Lymphoma, T-Cell. Leukemia, T-Cell. Leukemia-Lymphoma, Adult T-Cell. Lymphoma, Large-Cell, ... Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Recurrent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Recurrent ... Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma ... Adult T-cell Leukemia/lymphoma Extranodal Nasal NK/T Cell Lymphoma Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/study/NCT01466881?show_locs=Y
*  Nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin's lymphoma - Wikipedia
2014). "Advanced-stage nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma compared with classical Hodgkin lymphoma: a matched pair ... Nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin's lymphoma (NLPHL) is an indolent CD20(+) form of lymphoma. Some people no longer ... Lymphoma Association (UK) Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NLPHL) Facebook Group Progressive transformation ... December 2015). "Nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma: a Lymphoma Study Association retrospective study". ...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nodular_lymphocyte_predominant_Hodgkin's_lymphoma
*  AIDS-related lymphoma - Wikipedia
In AIDS, the incidences of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, primary cerebral lymphoma and Hodgkin's disease are all increased. There are ... B-cell immunoblastic lymphoma, and Burkitt's lymphoma (small non-cleaved cell lymphoma). The symptoms of AIDS-related lymphoma ... AIDS-related lymphoma describes lymphomas occurring in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). A lymphoma is a ... Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) is present in about 1%-3% of HIV seropositive people at the time of the initial diagnosis of HIV. ...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AIDS-related_lymphoma
*  Drugs Approved for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma - National Cancer Institute
... for non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations. ... This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The list includes ... This page also lists common drug combinations used in non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The individual drugs in the combinations are FDA- ... There may be drugs used in non-Hodgkin lymphoma that are not listed here. ...
https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/treatment/drugs/non-hodgkin
*  Hodgkin Lymphoma
Hodgkin disease) is a type of lymphoma, a cancer that starts in white blood cells called lymphocytes. Lymphocytes are part of ... Hodgkin Lymphoma. Hodgkin lymphoma (Hodgkin disease) is a cancer that starts in white blood cells called lymphocytes. ... If You Have Hodgkin Lymphoma. If you or someone you know has just been diagnosed with Hodgkin lymphoma, this short, simple ... About Hodgkin Lymphoma. Get an overview of Hodgkin lymphoma and the latest key statistics in the US. ...
https://www.cancer.org/cancer/hodgkin-lymphoma.html
*  Hodgkin Lymphoma
Although cancer can seem scary, most teens who get Hodgkin's disease get better. ... Hodgkin's disease is a type of lymphoma, which is a cancer of the lymphatic system. ... Hodgkin Lymphoma. Resources. Please Note: By clicking a link to any resource listed on this page, you will be leaving the ... The Society's mission is to cure leukemia, lymphoma, Hodgkin's disease, and myeloma, and to improve the quality of life of ...
http://kidshealth.org/en/teens/hodgkins.html?view=rr
*  Hodgkin Lymphoma
Although cancer can seem scary, most teens who get Hodgkin's disease get better. ... Hodgkin's disease is a type of lymphoma, which is a cancer of the lymphatic system. ... What Is Hodgkin Lymphoma?. Hodgkin lymphoma is a type of cancer called a lymphoma, which is a cancer of the lymphatic system. ... Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma.. Lymphomas that involve a particular type of cell, called a Reed-Sternberg cell, are ...
http://kidshealth.org/RadyChildrens/en/teens/hodgkins.html

*  Nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin's lymphoma
2014). "Advanced-stage nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma compared with classical Hodgkin lymphoma: a matched pair ... Nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin's lymphoma (NLPHL) is an indolent CD20(+) form of lymphoma. Some people no longer ... Lymphoma Association (UK) Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NLPHL) Facebook Group Progressive transformation ... December 2015). "Nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma: a Lymphoma Study Association retrospective study". ...
*  B-cell lymphoma
B-cell lymphomas include both Hodgkin's lymphomas and most non-Hodgkin lymphomas. They are typically divided into low and high ... Classic Hodgkin's lymphoma and nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin's lymphoma are now considered forms of B-cell lymphoma. ... Richter's transformation T-cell lymphoma Merck Manual home edition, Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas "The Lymphomas" (PDF). The Leukemia ... Five account for nearly three out of four patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma: Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) Follicular ...
*  Mantle cell lymphoma
... (MCL) is a type of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), comprising about 6% of NHL cases. There are only about ... Leukemia&Lymphoma Society (2014). "Mantle Cell Lymphoma Facts" (pdf). www.LLS.org. Mantle Cell Lymphoma: An Update for ... The workup for Mantle cell lymphoma is similar to the workup for many indolent lymphomas and certain aggressive lymphomas. ... of non-Hodgkin lymphoma cases are mantle cell lymphoma. As of 2015, the ratio of males to females affected is about 4:1. List ...
*  Alefacept
It is also being studied in the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma and T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Alefacept is a fusion ... Most of these were nonmelanoma and melanoma skin cancers, other solid tumors, and lymphomas. Infections : In clinical studies ...
*  Burkitt's lymphoma
Non-Hodgkin lymphoma, which includes Burkitt's, accounts for 30-50% of childhood lymphoma. The jaw is less commonly involved, ... Since Burkitt lymphoma and other B-cell lymphomas are a clonal proliferative process, all tumor cells from one patient are ... The tumor cells have a similar appearance to the cancer cells of classical endemic Burkitt lymphoma. Sporadic lymphomas are ... Unique genetic alterations promote cell survival in Burkitt lymphoma, distinct from other types of lymphoma. These TCF3 and ID3 ...
*  Working Formulation
The Working formulation is an obsolete classification of non-Hodgkin lymphomas, first proposed in 1982. It has since been ... immunoblastic Malignant lymphoma, lymphoblastic Malignant lymphoma, small noncleaved cells (Burkitt lymphoma) Miscellaneous ... Low Grade Malignant lymphoma, small lymphocytic (chronic lymphocytic leukemia) Malignant lymphoma, follicular, predominantly ... "Management of localized non-Hodgkin's lymphoma". CMAJ. 133 (6): 559-64. PMC 1346220 . PMID 3896450. ...
*  AIDS-related lymphoma
In AIDS, the incidences of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, primary cerebral lymphoma and Hodgkin's disease are all increased. There are ... B-cell immunoblastic lymphoma, and Burkitt's lymphoma (small non-cleaved cell lymphoma). The symptoms of AIDS-related lymphoma ... AIDS-related lymphoma describes lymphomas occurring in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). A lymphoma is a ... Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) is present in about 1%-3% of HIV seropositive people at the time of the initial diagnosis of HIV. ...
*  Hodgkin's lymphoma
Stage 1 Hodgkin's lymphoma Stage 2 Hodgkin's lymphoma Stage 3 Hodgkin's lymphoma Stage 4 Hodgkin's lymphoma Macroscopy Affected ... There are two major types of Hodgkin lymphoma: classical Hodgkin lymphoma and nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma. ... Hodgkin's lymphoma at Curlie (based on DMOZ) Hodgkin Disease at American Cancer Society Hodgkin's Lymphoma at the American ... The staging is the same for both Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. After Hodgkin lymphoma is diagnosed, a patient will be ...
*  Non-Hodgkin lymphoma
... (NHL) is a group of blood cancers that includes all types of lymphoma except Hodgkin's lymphomas. Symptoms ... Less aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphomas are compatible with a long survival while more aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphomas can be ... To this day, lymphoma statistics are compiled as Hodgkin's versus non-Hodgkin lymphomas by major cancer agencies, including the ... associated with Burkitt's lymphoma, Hodgkin's lymphoma, follicular dendritic cell sarcoma, extranodal NK-T-cell lymphoma Human ...
*  DMOZ - Health: Conditions and Diseases: Cancer: Hematologic: Lymphoma: Hodgkin's Disease
MedlinePlus: Hodgkin's Disease Provides overview of Hodgkin's disease, news, treatment, diagnosis and symptoms information. ... Adult Hodgkin's Disease The U.S. National Cancer Institute addresses general information, diagnosis, staging and treatment ... The KDH Hodgkin's Disease Foundation Information about the activities of this non-profit organization which funds clinical ... National Cancer Institute - What You Need To Know About Hodgkin's Disease Information about detection, symptoms, diagnosis, and ...
*  DMOZ - Health: Conditions and Diseases: Cancer: Hematologic: Lymphoma: Hodgkin's Disease: Memorials
Tributes in memory of the courageous children and adults who have lost their battle with Hodgkin's Disease. ... Tributes in memory of the courageous children and adults who have lost their battle with Hodgkin's Disease. ...
*  DMOZ - Health: Conditions and Diseases: Cancer: Hematologic: Lymphoma: Hodgkin's Disease: Personal Pages
Health Conditions and Diseases Cancer Hematologic Lymphoma Hodgkin's Disease Personal Pages 4 ... Dave's Happy Little Hodgkin's Disease Web Site Survivor Dave Kristula details his experiences having lymphoma as a teenager. ... Li(sa) Sparks Guethlein's: Hodgkin's Disease Information Provides links, new patient information and a section on coping with ...
*  DMOZ - Health: Conditions and Diseases: Cancer: Hematologic: Lymphoma: Non-Hodgkin's
There are several types of lymphoma including: Adult non-Hodgkin's lymphoma Childhood non-Hodgkin's lymphoma Primary central ... There are several types of lymphoma including: Adult non-Hodgkin's lymphoma Childhood non-Hodgkin's lymphoma Primary central ... NHS Choices: Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Provides information on this cancer of the lymphatic system. Includes a short video and ... Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) in Children Provides information about the disease, treatment options, and the differences between ...
*  DMOZ - Health: Conditions and Diseases: Cancer: Hematologic: Lymphoma: Non-Hodgkin's: Personal Pages
Health Conditions and Diseases Cancer Hematologic Lymphoma Non-Hodgkin's Personal Pages 5 ... Story of a little girl and her fight against Non Hodgkin's Lymphoblastic Lymphoma. Includes journal, picture, and a guest book ... Long term survivor of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma describes his story which includes a bone marrow transplant. Find information and ... Lymphoma Journal A story of life and recovery from non-Hodgkins lymphoma. Includes detailed descriptions, photography and ...
*  DMOZ - Health: Conditions and Diseases: Cancer: Hematologic: Lymphoma: Non-Hodgkin's: Cutaneous Lymphoma
... cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma, adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, peripheral T-cell lymphoma, lymphomatoid ... Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma is a general term for lymphomas of the skin including mycosis fungoides, Sézary syndrome, ... Health Conditions and Diseases Cancer Hematologic Lymphoma Non-Hodgkin's Cutaneous Lymphoma 2 ... cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma, adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, peripheral T-cell lymphoma, lymphomatoid ...
*  DMOZ - Health: Conditions and Diseases: Cancer: Hematologic: Lymphoma: Non-Hodgkin's: Burkitt's Lymphoma
Type of B-cell lymphoma first described by Dennis Burkitt who was working in Africa at the time. The disease was common to the ... Health Conditions and Diseases Cancer Hematologic Lymphoma Non-Hodgkin's Burkitt's Lymphoma 3 ... Burkitt's Lymphoma Resources Resources for dealing with Burkitts Lymphoma, a rare form of cancer. Provides survivor stories, ... "Health ... Burkitt's Lymphoma" search on: AOL - Ask - Bing - DuckDuckGo - Gigablast - Google - ixquick - Yahoo - Yandex - Yippy ...
*  List of OMIM disorder codes
FOXC2 Lymphoma, non-Hodgkin; 605027; PRF1 Lymphoma, non-Hodgkin, somatic; 605027; RAD54L Lymphoproliferative syndrome, EBV- ... GNE Non-Hodgkin lymphoma, somatic; 605027; CASP10 Nonsmall cell lung cancer, response to tyrosine kinase inhibitor in; 211980; ... HMGCS2 Hodgkin lymphoma; 236000; KLHDC8B Holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency; 253270; HLCS Holoprosencephaly-2; 157170; SIX3 ... RECQL4 Rapp-Hodgkin syndrome; 129400; TP63 Recombination rate QTL 1; 612042; RNF212 Refsum disease; 266500; PEX7 Refsum disease ...
*  Hepatomegaly
"Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma , Doctor , Patient". Patient. Retrieved 2016-03-11. "Primary biliary cirrhosis: MedlinePlus Medical ... In the case of lymphoma the treatment options include single-agent (or multi-agent) chemotherapy and regional radiotherapy, ... infections Hydatid cyst Leptospirosis Actinomycosis Metastatic tumours Hepatocellular carcinoma Myeloma Leukemia Lymphoma ...
*  Vinca
"Chemotherapy for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma". cancer.org. American Cancer Society. May 31, 2016. Retrieved June 22, 2017. " ... "Chemotherapy for Hodgkin Lymphoma". cancer.org. American Cancer Society. March 29, 2017. Retrieved June 22, 2017. "Chemotherapy ... "Chemotherapy for Hodgkin Lymphoma". cancer.org. American Cancer Society. March 29, 2017. Retrieved June 22, 2017. " ... lymphomas, and childhood cancers, as well as several other types of cancer and some non-cancerous conditions. Vinblastine is a ...
*  Oncology
It includes Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL): Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) Chemotherapy with ABVD or BEACOPP ... Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) Chemo-immunotherapy (R-CHOP) for B cell lymphomas and chemotherapy (CHOP) for T cell lymphomas. ... "Prognostic value of B-symptoms in low-grade non-hodgkin's lymphomas". Leukemia & Lymphoma. 13 (3-4): 357-358. doi:10.3109/ ... Hande, K. R.; Garrow, G. C. (1993-02-01). "Acute tumor lysis syndrome in patients with high-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma". The ...
*  Infections associated with diseases
Hjalgrim, H.; Engels, E. A. (2008). "Infectious aetiology of Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas: a review of the epidemiological ... "Association between SV40 and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma". Leukemia & lymphoma. 44 Suppl 3: S33-9. doi:10.1080/10428190310001623784 ... Mazzaro, C; Tirelli, U; Pozzato, G (2005). "Hepatitis C virus and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma 10 years later". Digestive and Liver ... Carbone, Antonino; Gloghini, Annunziata; Serraino, Diego; Spina, Michele (2009). "HIV-associated Hodgkin lymphoma". Current ...
*  Eric Berry
"Eric Berry has Hodgkin's lymphoma". ESPN. Retrieved 21 March 2015. "Eric Berry named NFL's Comeback Player of the Year". "'Top ... A mass was soon discovered in his chest, with him eventually being diagnosed with Hodgkin's lymphoma on December 8, 2014. Berry ... He was diagnosed with Hodgkin's lymphoma on December 8, 2014. After going through chemotherapy in the offseason and being ... after overcoming Hodgkin's Lymphoma. The Chiefs placed the franchise tag on Berry on July 14, 2016. Due to both parties not ...
*  Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital & Research Centre
Transcriptional profiling of Hodgkin's Lymphoma; relationship to EBV status, histological subtype and geographical locale. ...
*  Virginia v. Cherrix
"Facts and Statistics: Hodgkin Lymphoma". Facts 2010-2011. USA: Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. 23 February 2011. Retrieved 7 ... Hodgkin's disease is highly treatable, even curable, type of lymphoma; 96% of young patients survive at least five years after ... refusal to allow him to receive chemotherapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma, the same disease at issue in Virginia v. Cherrix. The ... Cherrix was diagnosed with Hodgkin's disease in 2005 and underwent three months of chemotherapy, a standard medical treatment ...
*  Allan G. Bromley
He died of Hodgkin's lymphoma. Allan George Bromley was born on 1 February 1947 and named after his uncle Allan, who was killed ... In 1998, after a long spell of illness, he was diagnosed with Hodgkin's lymphoma. He met Anne Mitchell at this time and on 15 ...
*  Proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase Src
Dasatinib is also in clinical trials for the use in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, metastatic breast cancer and prostate cancer. Other ...
*  Peripheral T-cell lymphoma
... cutaneous T-cell lymphomas are classified separately. "ACS :: What Is Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma?". Retrieved 2009-02-03. ... Examples include: Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma Extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, ... type T-cell lymphoma Subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphoma Anaplastic large cell lymphoma Peripheral T-cell lymphoma- ... Peripheral T-cell lymphoma refers to a group of T-cell lymphomas that develop away from the thymus. ...

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  • diffuse large B-
  • This is because the Reed-Sternberg cell (RSC) variants (popcorn cells) that characterize this form of the disease invariably express B lymphocyte markers such as CD20 (thus making NLPHL an unusual form of B cell lymphoma), and that (unlike classic HL) NLPHL may progress to diffuse large B cell lymphoma. (wikipedia.org)
  • biopsies
  • If HL has already been diagnosed, needle biopsies are sometimes used to check changes (like swollen nodes) in other parts of the body that might be from the lymphoma spreading or coming back after treatment. (cancer.org)
  • anaplastic
  • Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma is a general term for lymphomas of the skin including mycosis fungoides, Sézary syndrome, lymphomatoid papulosis, cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma, adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, peripheral T-cell lymphoma, lymphomatoid granulomatosis, granulomatous slack skin disease, and pagetoid reticulosis. (dmoztools.net)
  • Patients
  • Eight cycles of escalated-dose BEACOPP compared with four cycles of escalated-dose BEACOPP followed by four cycles of baseline-dose BEACOPP with or without radiotherapy in patients with advanced-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma: final analysis of the HD12 trial of the German Hodgkin Study Group. (springer.com)
  • Addition of rituximab to BEACOPP escalated to improve the outcome of early interim PET positive advanced stage Hodgkin lymphoma patients: second planned interim analysis of the HD18 study. (springer.com)
  • Recent developments in the therapy of non-Hodgkin lymphoma have improved response and survival rates in patients with these conditions. (springer.com)
  • An information, research and support resource for patients and caregivers dealing with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. (dmoztools.net)
  • Leukemia
  • The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS), founded in 1949, is the world's largest voluntary health organization dedicated to funding blood cancer research, education and patient services. (wikipedia.org)
  • LLS has 64 chapters in the United States, as well as five chapters in Canada (Leukemia & Lymphoma Society of Canada). (wikipedia.org)
  • The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society is accredited with the Better Business Bureau, meeting all 20 standards for charitable accountability and is certified by HonCode, Health on the Net Foundation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Originally known as the Robert Roesler de Villiers Foundation, The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society was founded in New York City in 1949 by Rudolph and Antoinette de Villiers after the death of their son Robert from leukemia. (wikipedia.org)
  • The name of the organization was later changed to the Leukemia Society of America in the 1960s, and later to The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society in 2000 to reflect the organization's focus on all types of blood cancer. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since its founding, The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society has provided more than 600 million dollars for research on blood cancers and has coordinated a nationwide informational clearinghouse for medical professionals, caregivers, and patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to VaccineNewsDaily, the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society is urging the state of California to reconsider its standard benefit design due to the potential negative impact on specialty medication users like cancer patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • Additionally, there are yearly endurance events run to benefit the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, including the Rock 'n' Roll San Diego Marathon and Half Marathon, held on June 6, 2010. (wikipedia.org)
  • cases
  • Most cases were angiosarcomas (27.3%) with an incidence of 0.107 per 1,000,000 person-years and Non- Hodgkin's lymphomas [NHL] (26.9%), with an incidence of 0.108 per 1,000,000 person-years. (wikipedia.org)