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Solanum tuberosum: A plant species of the genus SOLANUM, family SOLANACEAE. The starchy roots are used as food. SOLANINE is found in green parts.Solanum: A plant genus of the family SOLANACEAE. Members contain SOLANACEOUS ALKALOIDS. Some species in this genus are called deadly nightshade which is also a common name for ATROPA BELLADONNA.Plant Tubers: An enlarged underground root or stem of some plants. It is usually rich in carbohydrates. Some, such as POTATOES, are important human FOOD. They may reproduce vegetatively from buds.Solanum nigrum: A plant species of the genus SOLANUM, family SOLANACEAE that contains steroidal glycosides.Plant Proteins: Proteins found in plants (flowers, herbs, shrubs, trees, etc.). The concept does not include proteins found in vegetables for which VEGETABLE PROTEINS is available.Plants, Genetically Modified: PLANTS, or their progeny, whose GENOME has been altered by GENETIC ENGINEERING.Solanum melongena: A plant species of the genus SOLANUM, family SOLANACEAE. The fruit is a large, egg-shaped berry, varying in color from dark purple to red, yellowish, or white. The leaves are large and ovate. The flowers are pendant, violet, and two inches across.Lycopersicon esculentum: A plant species of the family SOLANACEAE, native of South America, widely cultivated for their edible, fleshy, usually red fruit.Plant Stems: Parts of plants that usually grow vertically upwards towards the light and support the leaves, buds, and reproductive structures. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Phytophthora infestans: A species of parasitic OOMYCETES in the family Peronosporaceae that is the causative agent of late blight of potato.Solanaceae: A plant family of the order Solanales, subclass Asteridae. Among the most important are POTATOES; TOMATOES; CAPSICUM (green and red peppers); TOBACCO; and BELLADONNA.Plant Leaves: Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)Glucose-1-Phosphate Adenylyltransferase: An ATP-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the addition of ADP to alpha-D-glucose 1-phosphate to form ADP-glucose and diphosphate. The reaction is the rate-limiting reaction in prokaryotic GLYCOGEN and plant STARCH biosynthesis.Gene Expression Regulation, Plant: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in plants.Phytophthora: A genus of destructive parasitic OOMYCETES in the family Peronosporaceae, order Peronosporales, affecting numerous fruit, vegetable, and other crops. Differentiation of zoospores usually takes place in the sporangium and no vesicle is formed. It was previously considered a fungus.Plant Diseases: Diseases of plants.Starch: Any of a group of polysaccharides of the general formula (C6-H10-O5)n, composed of a long-chain polymer of glucose in the form of amylose and amylopectin. It is the chief storage form of energy reserve (carbohydrates) in plants.Starch Phosphorylase: An enzyme of the PHOSPHORYLASES family that catalyzes the degradation of starch, a mixture of unbranched AMYLOSE and branched AMYLOPECTIN compounds. This phosphorylase from plants is the counterpart of GLYCOGEN PHOSPHORYLASE in animals that catalyzes the reaction of inorganic phosphate on the terminal alpha-1,4-glycosidic bond at the non-reducing end of glucans resulting in the release of glucose-1-phosphate.Datura stramonium: A plant species of the genus DATURA, family SOLANACEAE, that contains TROPANES and other SOLANACEOUS ALKALOIDS.Plant Structures: The parts of plants, including SEEDS.Plant Roots: The usually underground portions of a plant that serve as support, store food, and through which water and mineral nutrients enter the plant. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982; Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Plants: Multicellular, eukaryotic life forms of kingdom Plantae (sensu lato), comprising the VIRIDIPLANTAE; RHODOPHYTA; and GLAUCOPHYTA; all of which acquired chloroplasts by direct endosymbiosis of CYANOBACTERIA. They are characterized by a mainly photosynthetic mode of nutrition; essentially unlimited growth at localized regions of cell divisions (MERISTEMS); cellulose within cells providing rigidity; the absence of organs of locomotion; absence of nervous and sensory systems; and an alternation of haploid and diploid generations.Genes, Plant: The functional hereditary units of PLANTS.Plant Lectins: Protein or glycoprotein substances of plant origin that bind to sugar moieties in cell walls or membranes. Some carbohydrate-metabolizing proteins (ENZYMES) from PLANTS also bind to carbohydrates, however they are not considered lectins. Many plant lectins change the physiology of the membrane of BLOOD CELLS to cause agglutination, mitosis, or other biochemical changes. They may play a role in plant defense mechanisms.RNA, Plant: Ribonucleic acid in plants having regulatory and catalytic roles as well as involvement in protein synthesis.Chromosomes, Plant: Complex nucleoprotein structures which contain the genomic DNA and are part of the CELL NUCLEUS of PLANTS.beta-Fructofuranosidase: A glycoside hydrolase found primarily in PLANTS and YEASTS. It has specificity for beta-D-fructofuranosides such as SUCROSE.Adenosine Diphosphate Glucose: Serves as the glycosyl donor for formation of bacterial glycogen, amylose in green algae, and amylopectin in higher plants.Isomaltose: A disaccharide consisting of two glucose units in an alpha (1-6) glycosidic linkage.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.DNA, Plant: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of plants.Lectins: Proteins that share the common characteristic of binding to carbohydrates. Some ANTIBODIES and carbohydrate-metabolizing proteins (ENZYMES) also bind to carbohydrates, however they are not considered lectins. PLANT LECTINS are carbohydrate-binding proteins that have been primarily identified by their hemagglutinating activity (HEMAGGLUTININS). However, a variety of lectins occur in animal species where they serve diverse array of functions through specific carbohydrate recognition.Caulimovirus: A genus of PLANT VIRUSES, in the family CAULIMOVIRIDAE, that are transmitted by APHIDS in a semipersistent manner. Aphid-borne transmission of some caulimoviruses requires certain virus-coded proteins termed transmission factors.Potexvirus: A genus of plant viruses in the family FLEXIVIRIDAE, that cause mosaic and ringspot symptoms. Transmission occurs mechanically. Potato virus X is the type species.Tobacco: A plant genus of the family SOLANACEAE. Members contain NICOTINE and other biologically active chemicals; its dried leaves are used for SMOKING.Rhizosphere: The immediate physical zone surrounding plant roots that include the plant roots. It is an area of intense and complex biological activity involving plants, microorganisms, other soil organisms, and the soil.Genome, Plant: The genetic complement of a plant (PLANTS) as represented in its DNA.Glyceric AcidsSequence Homology, Amino Acid: The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Oxylipins: Eighteen-carbon cyclopentyl polyunsaturated fatty acids derived from ALPHA-LINOLENIC ACID via an oxidative pathway analogous to the EICOSANOIDS in animals. Biosynthesis is inhibited by SALICYLATES. A key member, jasmonic acid of PLANTS, plays a similar role to ARACHIDONIC ACID in animals.Lipoxygenase: An enzyme of the oxidoreductase class primarily found in PLANTS. It catalyzes reactions between linoleate and other fatty acids and oxygen to form hydroperoxy-fatty acid derivatives.Plastids: Self-replicating cytoplasmic organelles of plant and algal cells that contain pigments and may synthesize and accumulate various substances. PLASTID GENOMES are used in phylogenetic studies.Cyclopentanes: A group of alicyclic hydrocarbons with the general formula R-C5H9.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Apyrase: A calcium-activated enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of ATP to yield AMP and orthophosphate. It can also act on ADP and other nucleoside triphosphates and diphosphates. EC 3.6.1.5.Sucrose: A nonreducing disaccharide composed of GLUCOSE and FRUCTOSE linked via their anomeric carbons. It is obtained commercially from SUGARCANE, sugar beet (BETA VULGARIS), and other plants and used extensively as a food and a sweetener.DNA, Complementary: Single-stranded complementary DNA synthesized from an RNA template by the action of RNA-dependent DNA polymerase. cDNA (i.e., complementary DNA, not circular DNA, not C-DNA) is used in a variety of molecular cloning experiments as well as serving as a specific hybridization probe.Cloning, Molecular: The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.Nucleotidyltransferases: A class of enzymes that transfers nucleotidyl residues. EC 2.7.7.Carbohydrate Metabolism: Cellular processes in biosynthesis (anabolism) and degradation (catabolism) of CARBOHYDRATES.Sequence Alignment: The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.Carbohydrates: The largest class of organic compounds, including STARCH; GLYCOGEN; CELLULOSE; POLYSACCHARIDES; and simple MONOSACCHARIDES. Carbohydrates are composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen in a ratio of Cn(H2O)n.Photoperiod: The time period of daily exposure that an organism receives from daylight or artificial light. It is believed that photoperiodic responses may affect the control of energy balance and thermoregulation.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Disease Resistance: The capacity of an organism to defend itself against pathological processes or the agents of those processes. This most often involves innate immunity whereby the organism responds to pathogens in a generic way. The term disease resistance is used most frequently when referring to plants.Mitochondria: Semiautonomous, self-reproducing organelles that occur in the cytoplasm of all cells of most, but not all, eukaryotes. Each mitochondrion is surrounded by a double limiting membrane. The inner membrane is highly invaginated, and its projections are called cristae. Mitochondria are the sites of the reactions of oxidative phosphorylation, which result in the formation of ATP. They contain distinctive RIBOSOMES, transfer RNAs (RNA, TRANSFER); AMINO ACYL T RNA SYNTHETASES; and elongation and termination factors. Mitochondria depend upon genes within the nucleus of the cells in which they reside for many essential messenger RNAs (RNA, MESSENGER). Mitochondria are believed to have arisen from aerobic bacteria that established a symbiotic relationship with primitive protoeukaryotes. (King & Stansfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Allium: A genus of the plant family Liliaceae (sometimes classified as Alliaceae) in the order Liliales. Many produce pungent, often bacteriostatic and physiologically active compounds and are used as VEGETABLES; CONDIMENTS; and medicament, the latter in traditional medicine.

*  Clinico-Immunological Analysis of Eggplant (Solanum melongena) Allergy Indicates Preponderance of Allergens in the Peel | World...
Solanum tuberosum) allergens belonging to the family of soybean trypsin inhibitors. Allergy. 2001, 56: 619-626. 10.1034/j.1398- ... Eggplant or aubergine (Solanum melongena L.) has been cultivated in Asia, Europe, and other parts of the world [1, 2]; it is ... Eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) is known to cause food allergy in some Asian countries but detailed studies on eggplant allergy ... Harish Babu BN, Mahesh PA, Venkatesh YP: A cross-sectional study on the prevalence of food allergy to eggplant (Solanum ...
https://waojournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1097/WOX.0b013e3181b71c07
*  Comparative transcriptome analysis of eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) and turkey berry (Solanum torvum Sw.): phylogenomics and...
... is the third most agriculturally important crop from the genus Solanum after potato (S. tuberosum) [1] and tomato (S. ... Solanum torvum Sw.Solanum melongena L.Comparative transcriptomicsEvolutionPlant resistance genes ... Comparative transcriptome analysis of eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) and turkey berry (Solanum torvum Sw.): phylogenomics and ... Guri A, Sink K: Interspecific somatic hybrid plants between eggplant (Solanum melongena) and Solanum torvum. Theor Appl Genet. ...
https://bmcgenomics.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-2164-15-412
*  Solanum tuberosum (Potato)
Solanum. Strains i. › cv. AM 80.5793. › cv. AM79.7322 ,AM79.7322. › cv. Arran Banner. › cv. BF15. › cv. Berolina. More ». › cv ... Solanum tuberosum L.. ›Solanum tuberosum subsp. tuberosum. ›potatoes. Rank i. SPECIES. Lineage i. › cellular organisms. › ...
https://www.uniprot.org/taxonomy/4113
*  Solanum tuberosum
Solanum carolinense , Solanum dulcamara , Solanum nigrum (americanum) , Solanum tuberosum , Sorghum species , Symplocarpus ... Solanum tuberosum. POTATO. This is a large genus of plants with over ~ 1500 species distributed worldwide. Various species are ... found throughout the U.S. The ones of particular concern in the U.S. include Solanum nigrum (black nightshade), S. dulcamara ( ... bittersweet nightshade), S. tuberosum (potato) and S. carolinense (horsenettle).. Distinguishing features. A 0.4-1 meter tall ...
http://research.vet.upenn.edu/Plants/PlantsbyLatinName/Solanumtuberosum/tabid/5677/Default.aspx
*  Solanum tuberosum ( Antwerp Potato ) | Backyard Gardener
'Antwerp' also known as 'Early Rose', 'Boston Market', and 'Chicago Market', is a heirloom variety potato. This variety has historically been known by over 20 names, due to its popularity at the market. It is an early-cropping variety, excellent for baking or boiling. Grows well in a variety of soil types. Potatoes
https://www.backyardgardener.com/plantname/solanum-tuberosum-antwerp-potato/
*  Solanum tuberosum ( Green Mountain Potato ) | Backyard Gardener
'Green Mountain' is an heirloom variety potato. This is a high-starch, late-season potato excellent for potato chips. Stores well. Flowers are white. Potatoes are perennials grown as annuals. They are related to eggplant, tomatoes and peppers. Potatoes need a frost free growing season of 90 to 120 days. They are a
https://www.backyardgardener.com/plantname/solanum-tuberosum-green-mountain-potato/
*  Solanum tuberosum ( Red LaSoda Potato ) | Backyard Gardener
Thick, green foliage grows from single stem. Tubers grow directly under plant for 2 feet. Yeild per plant is 2 to 5 pounds. Tuber is red, round and medium
https://www.backyardgardener.com/plantname/solanum-tuberosum-red-lasoda-potato/
*  Isolation of cell wall material from Solanum tuberosum.
... Author(s). Voragen, C.H.L.; Broek, L.A.M. van den; Schols, H.A.; ...
http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/43765
*  Solanum tuberosum in Flora of China @ efloras.org
Solanum tuberosum Linnaeus, Sp. Pl. 1: 185. 1753. 阳芋 yang yu Herbs erect or sprawling, 30-80 cm tall, glabrous or sparsely ...
http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=2&taxon_id=200020608
*  PlantFiles Pictures: Potato 'Red Pontiac' (Solanum tuberosum) by Farmerdill
Solanum tuberosum) at Dave's Garden. All pictures are contributed by our community. ... Potato 'Red Pontiac' (Solanum tuberosum). by Farmerdill Jun 17, 2005 11:33 PM ...
https://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/showimage/80050/
*  PlantFiles Pictures: Potato 'Red Pontiac' (Solanum tuberosum) by Farmerdill
Solanum tuberosum) at Dave's Garden. All pictures are contributed by our community. ... Potato 'Red Pontiac' (Solanum tuberosum). by Farmerdill Apr 22, 2005 10:09 AM ...
https://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/showimage/71814/
*  Solanum tuberosum ( Bintje Potato ) | Backyard Gardener - Gardening Information
Thick, green foliage grows from single stem. Tubers grow directly under plant for 2 feet. Yeild per plant is 2 to 5 pounds. Tuber is yellow, oblong and medium.
https://www.backyardgardener.com/plantname/solanum-tuberosum-bintje-potato/
*  Solanum tuberosum Stprx2 protein Summary Report | CureHunter
Solanum tuberosum Stprx2 protein: putative peroxidase; induced in response to wounding and to infection by Phytophthora ... Solanum tuberosum Stprx2 protein. Subscribe to New Research on Solanum tuberosum Stprx2 protein ... Stprx2 protein, Solanum tuberosum; prx2 protein, Solanum tuberosum. Networked: 0 relevant articles (0 outcomes, 0 trials/ ...
http://www.curehunter.com/public/keywordSummaryC434489-Solanum-tuberosum-Stprx2-protein.do
*  Solanum tuberosum - EY Laboratories, Inc.
Solanum tuberosum. About the Lectin Saline extracts of potato tubers contain a potent hemagglutininin that is not inhibited by ...
http://eylabs.com/solanum-tuberosum/
*  Production of Phytophthora infestans-resistant potato ( Solanum tuberosum) utilising Ensifer adhaerens OV14 | SpringerLink
Ensifer adhaerens Transformation Non-Agrobacterium strains Solanum tuberosum Transgenic Phytophthora infestans Electronic ... Wendt T, Doohan F, Winckelmann D, Mullins E (2011) Gene transfer into Solanum tuberosum via Rhizobium spp. Transgenic Res 20(2 ... Production of Phytophthora infestans-resistant potato (Solanum tuberosum) utilising Ensifer adhaerens OV14. ... Gene RB cloned from Solanum bulbocastanum confers broad spectrum resistance to potato late blight. Pro Natl Acad Sci USA 100(16 ...
https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11248-011-9553-3
*  SOLANUM TUBEROSUM AEGROTANS - Encyclopedia of Pure Materia Medica by TF Allen
Solanum Tuberosum Aegrotans homeopathy medicine - drug proving symptoms from Encyclopedia of Pure Materia Medica by TF Allen, ... Solanum Tuberosum Aegrotans homeopathy medicine - drug proving symptoms from Encyclopedia of Pure Materia Medica by TF Allen, ... Hpathy » Homeopathy Books » Encyclopedia of Pure Materia Medica by TF Allen » SOLANUM TUBEROSUM AEGROTANS ...
https://hpathy.com/e-books/encyclopedia-of-pure-materia-medica-by-tf-allen/solanum-tuberosum-aegrotans-sol-t-ae/
*  Lectins: Solanum Tuberosum (Potato) Lectin (STL, PL), Unconjugated | Vector Labs
Solanum tuberosum,/em, lectin consists of two identical 50 kDa subunits. The subunits can dissociate in solution to produce a ... Solanum tuberosum lectin consists of two identical 50 kDa subunits. The subunits can dissociate in solution to produce a ... Fluorescein labeled Solanum Tuberosum (Potato) Lectin (STL, PL) Catalog Number: FL-1161 ... Solanum Tuberosum (Potato) Lectin (STL, PL). / * Unconjugated Solanum Tuberosum (Potato) Lectin (STL, PL) ...
https://vectorlabs.com/unconjugated-solanum-tuberosum-potato-lectin-stl-pl.html
*  Genetic analysis of the cultivated potato Solanum tuberosum L. Phureja Group using RAPDs and nuclear SSRs | SpringerLink
The Solanum tuberosumL. Phureja Group consists of potato landraces widely grown in the Andes from western Venezuela to central ... The Solanum tuberosum L. Phureja Group consists of potato landraces widely grown in the Andes from western Venezuela to central ... Huamán Z, Ortiz R, Gómez R (2000) Selecting a Solanum tuberosum subsp. andigena core collection using morphological, ... Genetic analysis of the cultivated potato Solanum tuberosum L. Phureja Group using RAPDs and nuclear SSRs. ...
https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00122-006-0399-7
*  Potato Tuber 'Forest Gold'<...
Solanum tuberosum 'International Kidney'. *First Early / Salad.. *First introduced in 1879.. *White skin covers the deliciously ...
https://www.victoriananursery.co.uk/Potato_Tuber_Forest_Gold/
*  Rosmarinic acid ameliorates the negative effects of salinity in in vitro-regenerated potato explants ( Solanum tuberosum L.) |...
Ehsanpour A, Jones M (2000) Evaluation of direct shoot regeneration from stem explants of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) cv. ... Hansen J, Nielsen B, Nielsen SV (1999) In vitro shoot regeneration of Solanum tuberosum cultivars: interactions of medium ... Rosmarinic acid ameliorates the negative effects of salinity in in vitro-regenerated potato explants (Solanum tuberosum L.). ... Solanum tuberosum L.) plantlets subjected to salt and modeling drought stresses. Acta Physiol Plant 38:1-9CrossRefGoogle ...
https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11738-018-2622-y
*  Solanum tuberosum Group Phureja - Wikipedia
Solanum tuberosum Group Phureja is a cultivar-group of diploid potato plants originating from the Andean valleys in South ... By hybridization with Solanum tuberosum by the Scottish Crop Research Institute, varieties were obtained who are adapted to the ... Solanum phureja was originally described as a species in 1929 by Russian botanists Sergei Vasilievic Juzepczuk and Sergej ( ... "Name - Solanum phureja Juz. & Bukasov: Subordinate taxa". Tropicos.org. Missouri Botanical Garden. 14 April 2014. Ramsay, Gavin ...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solanum_tuberosum_Group_Phureja

*  Solanum
... tuberosum - Potato Section Pteroidea Section Quadrangulare Section Regmandra Section Solanum Solanum adscendens ... Solanum bellum Solanum cajanumense Solanum chimborazense Solanum chrysasteroides Solanum cinnamomeum Solanum conocarpum Rich. ... nightshade Solanum hypermegethes Solanum hypocalycosarcum Solanum interandinum Solanum latiflorum Solanum leucodendron Solanum ... Solanum melissarum Bohs Solanum nudum Dunal - Forest nightshade Solanum ovum-fringillae Solanum paralum Solanum parishii A. ...
*  Maris Piper
All four were the species Solanum tuberosum andigena and one of these, CPC 1673 was the source of nematode resistance in Maris ...
*  Solanum tuberosum Group Phureja
... is a cultivar-group of diploid potato plants originating from the Andean valleys in South ... By hybridization with Solanum tuberosum by the Scottish Crop Research Institute, varieties were obtained who are adapted to the ... Solanum phureja was originally described as a species in 1929 by Russian botanists Sergei Vasilievic Juzepczuk and Sergej ( ... "Name - Solanum phureja Juz. & Bukasov: Subordinate taxa". Tropicos.org. Missouri Botanical Garden. 14 April 2014. Ramsay, Gavin ...
*  Epítome de la conquista del Nuevo Reino de Granada
Solanum tuberosum). The word written as hayo probably refers to the Ika word hayu. Colombian-Jewish-Ukrainian scholar Juan ...
*  Superior potato
"Superior (Solanum tuberosum)". potatoassociation.org. Retrieved 4 January 2016. Rieman, G. H. (1962) "Superior: a new white ...
*  Episteme adulatrix
It is a day flying moth (hence the common name). Caterpillars feed on Solanum tuberosum. Upperside Museum specimen Episteme ...
*  Belle de Fontenay
"Solanum tuberosum 'Belle de Fontenay'". Gardener's World. Retrieved 26 February 2012. Alan Romans (October 2005). The Potato ...
*  History of the potato
Andean Native Potatoes (Solanum tuberosum subsp. andigena) (PDF). p. 5. Retrieved 28 February 2012. Bengoa, José (2003). ...
*  List of Bohol flora and fauna
patatas - potatoes; Solanum tuberosum singkamas - Pachyrrhizus erosus Linn. Ube kinampay - purple yam; Dioscorea alata Ube- yam ... Solanum melongena Ocimum sanctum - holy basil upo - Lagenaria leucantha; bottle gourd Corindrium sativum - coriander leaf ... Solanum capsicum (Solanaceae) singkamas - Pachyrhizus erosus; yambean tangkong or kangkong; Ipomoea aquatica; swamp cabbage, ... Solanum lycopersicum or Lycopersicum esculentum kamunggay - malunggay; Moringa oleifera katuray - Sesbania grandiflora, a white ...
*  Ploidy
"The Biology of Solanum tuberosum (L.) (Potatoes)". Canadian Food Inspection Agency. John O. Oberpriller; A Mauro. The ... Bender K (1963). "Über die Erzeugung und Entstehung dihaploider Pflanzen bei Solanum tuberosum"". Zeitschrift für ... Solanum tuberosum) is an example of a tetraploid organism, carrying four sets of chromosomes. The potato plant inherits two ...
*  Tecia solanivora
The larvae feed on Solanum tuberosum (potato). They enter tubers and feed on them, building galleries which may completely ...
*  Qhini Jamach'ini
... (Aymara qhini selected, best potato, jamach'i bird; a variety of potato (Solanum tuberosum subsp. andigena), - ...
*  Protocarnivorous plant
ultramontana, Solanum tuberosum, Stellaria americana, and Stellaria jamesiana. These species tested positive for protease ...
*  Symmetrischema tangolias
The larvae are a pest on Solanum tuberosum. It attacks the tubers as well as the stems and leaves of the plant. Pupation takes ...
*  Plant defensin
Probable protease inhibitor P322 from Solanum tuberosum (Potato). A germination-related protein from Vigna unguiculata (Cowpea ...
*  Genetically engineered potato
Transgenic Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.)". Transgenic Crops II. Springer. pp. 305-324. ISBN 978-3-642-56901-2. ... This gene, which conferred the resistance to blight, was isolated from a wild relative of potatoes, Solanum venturii, which is ...
*  Patatin
... is a glycoprotein found in potatoes (Solanum tuberosum). The main function of patatin is as a storage protein but it ... Bánfalvi Z, Kostyál Z, Barta E (1994). "Solanum brevidens possesses a non-sucrose-inducible patatin gene". Mol. Gen. Genet. 245 ...
*  Noel Farnie Robertson
"The Accumulation of Phenolic Acids in Tissue Culture-pathogen Combinations of Solanum Tuberosum and Phyto-phthora Infestans." ... "Interaction between Phytophthora Infestans and Tissue Cultures of Solanum Tuberosum." Microbiology 40.3 (1965): 431-37. Print. ...
*  Batata
Solanum tuberosum; only distantly related to sweet potato) in Portuguese. The same has been adapted in many Indian Languages ...
*  Cisgenesis
2009). "Molecular breeding for resistance to Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.): a ...
*  Ralstonia solanacearum
Solanum tuberosum); tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum); aubergine (egg plant) (Solanum melongena); banana, (Musa spp); geranium ( ... Solanum dulcamara) Geranium: Wilting begins with lower leaves and petioles and works its way up the plant. Wilted leaves have ...
*  Agrotis porphyricollis
They are considered a pest on Beta vulgaris and Solanum tuberosum. Herbison-Evans, Don; Crossley, Stella (2006) Agrotis ...
*  Platycorynus peregrinus
Solanum melongena, Hibiscus esculentus, Abelmoschus esculentus, Lycopersicon esculentum and Solanum tuberosum). This species ...
*  Potato leafroll virus
The most economically important host is the Potato, Solanum tuberosum spp. In potato, symptoms of primary infection, infection ... PLRV infects other hosts including moonflower, Datura stramonium causing interveinal necrosis and hairy nightshade, Solanum ...
*  Potato spindle tuber viroid
The natural hosts are potatoes (Solanum tuberosum) and tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum). All potatoes and tomatoes are ...
*  M. S. Swaminathan
His professional career began in 1949: 1949-55 - Research on potato (Solanum tuberosum), wheat (Triticum aestivum), rice (Oryza ... Solanum tuberosum. In 1950, he moved to study at the Plant Breeding Institute of the University of Cambridge School of ... Here he succeeded in standardising procedures for transferring genes from a wide range of wild species of Solanum to the ... and the Nature of Polyploidy in certain species of the genus Solanum - section Tuberarium." His work presented a new concept of ...
*  Martín Cárdenas (botanist)
He also registered 26 types of Solanum tuberosum with six varieties. In 1951, he was awarded the Mary Soper Pope Memorial Award ...

(1/1525) Synthesis and kinetic evaluation of 4-deoxymaltopentaose and 4-deoxymaltohexaose as inhibitors of muscle and potato alpha-glucan phosphorylases.

alpha-Glucan phosphorylases degrade linear or branched oligosaccharides via a glycosyl transfer reaction, occurring with retention of configuration, to generate alpha-glucose-1-phosphate (G1P). We report here the chemoenzymic synthesis of two incompetent oligosaccharide substrate analogues, 4-deoxymaltohexaose (4DG6) and 4-deoxymaltopentaose (4DG5), for use in probing this mechanism. A kinetic analysis of the interactions of 4DG5 and 4DG6 with both muscle and potato phosphorylases was completed to provide insight into the nature of the binding mode of oligosaccharide to phosphorylase. The 4-deoxy-oligosaccharides bind competitively with maltopentaose and non-competitively with respect to orthophosphate or G1P in each case, indicating binding in the oligosaccharide binding site. Further, 4DG5 and 4DG6 were found to bind to potato and muscle phosphorylases some 10-40-fold tighter than does maltopentaose. Similar increases in affinity as a consequence of 4-deoxygenation were observed previously for the binding of polymeric glycogen analogues to rabbit muscle phosphorylase [Withers (1990) Carbohydr. Res. 196, 61-73].  (+info)

(2/1525) Simultaneous antisense inhibition of two starch-synthase isoforms in potato tubers leads to accumulation of grossly modified amylopectin.

A chimaeric antisense construct was used to reduce the activities of the two major starch-synthase isoforms in potato tubers simultaneously. A range of reductions in total starch-synthase activities were found in the resulting transgenic plants, up to a maximum of 90% inhibition. The reduction in starch-synthase activity had a profound effect on the starch granules, which became extremely distorted in appearance compared with the control lines. Analysis of the starch indicated that the amounts produced in the tubers, and the amylose content of the starch, were not affected by the reduction in activity. In order to understand why the starch granules were distorted, amylopectin was isolated and the constituent chain lengths analysed. This indicated that the amylopectin was very different to that of the control. It contained more chains of fewer than 15 glucose units in length, and fewer of between 15 and 80 glucose units. In addition, the amylopectin contained more very long chains. Amylopectin from plants repressed in just one of the activities of the two starch-synthase isoforms, which we have reported upon previously, were also analysed. Using a technique different to that used previously we show that both isoforms also affect the amylopectin, but in a way that is different to when both isoforms are repressed together.  (+info)

(3/1525) Polynucleotide probes that target a hypervariable region of 16S rRNA genes to identify bacterial isolates corresponding to bands of community fingerprints.

Temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE) is well suited for fingerprinting bacterial communities by separating PCR-amplified fragments of 16S rRNA genes (16S ribosomal DNA [rDNA]). A strategy was developed and was generally applicable for linking 16S rDNA from community fingerprints to pure culture isolates from the same habitat. For this, digoxigenin-labeled polynucleotide probes were generated by PCR, using bands excised from TGGE community fingerprints as a template, and applied in hybridizations with dot blotted 16S rDNA amplified from bacterial isolates. Within 16S rDNA, the hypervariable V6 region, corresponding to positions 984 to 1047 (Escherichia coli 16S rDNA sequence), which is a subset of the region used for TGGE (positions 968 to 1401), best met the criteria of high phylogenetic variability, required for sufficient probe specificity, and closely flanking conserved priming sites for amplification. Removal of flanking conserved bases was necessary to enable the differentiation of closely related species. This was achieved by 5' exonuclease digestion, terminated by phosphorothioate bonds which were synthesized into the primers. The remaining complementary strand was removed by single-strand-specific digestion. Standard hybridization with truncated probes allowed differentiation of bacteria which differed by only two bases within the probe target site and 1.2% within the complete 16S rDNA. However, a truncated probe, derived from an excised TGGE band of a rhizosphere community, hybridized with three phylogenetically related isolates with identical V6 sequences. Only one of the isolates comigrated with the excised band in TGGE, which was shown to be due to identical sequences, demonstrating the utility of a combined TGGE and V6 probe approach.  (+info)

(4/1525) Divinyl ether fatty acid synthesis in late blight-diseased potato leaves.

We conducted a study of the patterns and dynamics of oxidized fatty acid derivatives (oxylipins) in potato leaves infected with the late-blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans. Two 18-carbon divinyl ether fatty acids, colneleic acid and colnelenic acid, accumulated during disease development. To date, there are no reports that such compounds have been detected in higher plants. The divinyl ether fatty acids accumulate more rapidly in potato cultivar Matilda (a cultivar with increased resistance to late blight) than in cultivar Bintje, a susceptible cultivar. Colnelenic acid reached levels of up to approximately 24 nmol (7 microgram) per g fresh weight of tissue in infected leaves. By contrast, levels of members of the jasmonic acid family did not change significantly during pathogenesis. The divinyl ethers also accumulated during the incompatible interaction of tobacco with tobacco mosaic virus. Colneleic and colnelenic acids were found to be inhibitory to P. infestans, suggesting a function in plant defense for divinyl ethers, which are unstable compounds rarely encountered in biological systems.  (+info)

(5/1525) The covalent attachment of polyamines to proteins in plant mitochondria.

Plant mitochondria from both potato and mung bean incorporated radioactivity into acid insoluble material when incubated with labelled polyamines (spermine, spermidine and putrescine). Extensive washing of mitochondrial precipitates with trichloroacetic acid and the excess of cold polyamine failed to remove bound radioactivity. Addition of nonradioactive polyamine stopped further incorporation of radioactivity but did not release radioactivity already bound. The radioactivity is incorporated into the membrane fraction. The labelling process has all the features of an enzymatic reaction: it is long lasting with distinctive kinetics peculiar to each polyamine, it is temperature dependent and is affected by N-ethylmaleimide. The latter inhibits the incorporation of putrescine but stimulates the incorporation of spermine and spermidine. Treatment of prelabelled mitochondria with pepsin releases bound radioactivity thus indicating protein to be the ligand for the attachment of polyamines. HPLC of mitochondrial hydrolysates revealed that the radioactivity bound to mitochondria is polyamines; traces of acetyl polyamines were also found in some samples. On autoradiograms of SDS/PAGE gels several radioactive bands of proteins were detected. Protein sequencing of labelled spots from a 2D gel gave a sequence which was 60% identical to catalase. We suggest that the attachment of polyamines to mitochondrial proteins occurs cotranslationally possibly via transglutaminases.  (+info)

(6/1525) Conversion of cucumber linoleate 13-lipoxygenase to a 9-lipoxygenating species by site-directed mutagenesis.

Multiple lipoxygenase sequence alignments and structural modeling of the enzyme/substrate interaction of the cucumber lipid body lipoxygenase suggested histidine 608 as the primary determinant of positional specificity. Replacement of this amino acid by a less-space-filling valine altered the positional specificity of this linoleate 13-lipoxygenase in favor of 9-lipoxygenation. These alterations may be explained by the fact that H608V mutation may demask the positively charged guanidino group of R758, which, in turn, may force an inverse head-to-tail orientation of the fatty acid substrate. The R758L+H608V double mutant exhibited a strongly reduced reaction rate and a random positional specificity. Trilinolein, which lacks free carboxylic groups, was oxygenated to the corresponding (13S)-hydro(pero)xy derivatives by both the wild-type enzyme and the linoleate 9-lipoxygenating H608V mutant. These data indicate the complete conversion of a linoleate 13-lipoxygenase to a 9-lipoxygenating species by a single point mutation. It is hypothesized that H608V exchange may alter the orientation of the substrate at the active site and/or its steric configuration in such a way that a stereospecific dioxygen insertion at C-9 may exclusively take place.  (+info)

(7/1525) Immunization with potato plants expressing VP60 protein protects against rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus.

The major structural protein VP60 of rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) has been produced in transgenic potato plants under the control of a cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter or a modified 35S promoter that included two copies of a strong transcriptional enhancer. Both types of promoters allowed the production of specific mRNAs and detectable levels of recombinant VP60, which were higher for the constructs carrying the modified 35S promoter. Rabbits immunized with leaf extracts from plants carrying this modified 35S promoter showed high anti-VP60 antibody titers and were fully protected against the hemorrhagic disease.  (+info)

(8/1525) Differential import of nuclear-encoded tRNAGly isoacceptors into solanum Tuberosum mitochondria.

In potato ( Solanum tuberosum ) mitochondria, about two-thirds of the tRNAs are encoded by the mitochondrial genome and one-third is imported from the cytosol. In the case of tRNAGly isoacceptors, a mitochondrial-encoded tRNAGly(GCC) was found in potato mitochondria, but this is likely to be insufficient to decode the four GGN glycine codons. In this work, we identified a cytosolic tRNAGly(UCC), which was found to be present in S.tuberosum mitochondria. The cytosolic tRNAGly(CCC) was also present in mitochondria, but to a lesser extent. By contrast, the cytosolic tRNAGly(GCC) could not be detected in mitochondria. This selective import of tRNAGly isoacceptors into S. tuberosum mitochondria raises further questions about the mechanism under-lying the specificity of the import process.  (+info)


  • SPECIES
  • Solanum phureja was originally described as a species in 1929 by Russian botanists Sergei Vasilievic Juzepczuk and Sergej (Sergei) Mikhailovich Bukasov. (wikipedia.org)
  • An exception was K. S. Dodds and G. J. Paxman, who in 1962 suggested it be included as one of five cultivar-groups of S. tuberosum, Group Phureja, based this on a number of factors, particularly poor morphological separation of cultivated diploid species. (wikipedia.org)